Packing the Modal 2.0

With 5 being perfect, this pack was a 3. It took a couple hours because I was working out the new arrangement of 650b wheels and disc. That’s the Modal 2.0 (rev’d from 1.0) in an S&S case. And, how I fly my bikes for free.

Modal 2.0 packed inside the case, ready to fly.

Bringing out the Hozan tool, a travel tool used to loosen and tighten S&S coupling means I’ve either started or ended a trip. This time of year that’s to Maui to ride big miles and relax.

Hozan tool loosening the S&S coupling.

After a couple packs, I should get the procedure down to about 30 minutes. As I shared after my first ride on the updated Modal, it’s configured now as a sporty 650B disc travel bike and for rolling fast in the wind with Zipp’s 303 650bs. That last time I did that was on a carbon bike with 700c, so lots to consider.

Modal 2.0 front rack, which will hold beer and sandals.

The Pack

Front triangle and rear wheel
Almost done.

Considering spatial relationships and the perfect pack, what you need to know about the S&S case is don’t overpack it, and because of the lengthy stays on the Modal, accommodating the slider dropouts, it goes one way good, other arrangements are awkward.

The packing process now with discs is

  • Drop the bar
  • Pulled the crank
  • Remove the calipers with plastic pad stoppers inserted

Then

  • Front triangle first
  • Rear wheel, rotors removed
  • Rear triangle
  • Front wheel, rotors removed
  • Bar and the rest of the bits like cages, tools, and shoes.

As long as the hydro cables don’t kink, should be ok, and I’ll reassembled the bike while listening to the ocean.

Learn more about bike travel in our archives and from our magazine on Medium.

The biggest takeaway of re-engaging the Modal is I was seduced by aero-road and carbon gravel bikes, and feel much more at home on metal, just riding.

For Maui, the fenders are removed, and not shown with the rack attached.