Baron Whip

Geoff Casey is working as hard as he does in a race on bringing attention back to steel with Baron Bicycles. He’s convinced steel is still viable, never wasn’t, and laments the generic carbon flavor of the month frames.

Props due for entering the bike industry, that’s hard enough, and then to take a stand with steel. He’s either conscripted himself to long hours with squeezed margins, arguing with snobby roadies concerned with carbon layups, or onto something good. We here hope the latter and appreciate the work custom builders do.

Baron Whip Racer: Custom Steel

I never thought steel wasn’t real and my first fast racing bike was Tange Prestige, later a Colnago with Columbus and those bikes set the bar for all my future bike reviews. Also my insistence that all bikes perform well, including urban. To Geoff, the deal with steel is

The bicycle market is full of mass produced frames, and if you want a custom bike built just for you, there are some options out there. But what if what you want is somewhere in between those two extremes? What if you care about supporting local craftspeople but don’t want to spend the time or money on a custom frame?

and

There is a famous business strategy book about identifying hidden opportunities in what is considered to be a tapped market. Baron Bicycles is here to put that concept into practice in the bike industry.

Baron Whip Racer: Custom Steel

Geoff believes people still want steel and we have no argument with that. To prove the viability of the material, he’s out racing the whip

Baron Whip Racer: Geoff Casey racing

and just won our local Tuesday Night worlds. That’s him in the photo with the green arm warmers.

Pricing on the Barons depends on how you build it up, but expect under 2K for frame and fork. Barons are semi-custom bikes. That means stock geometry with a bespoke build.