Rohloff Surly

Reblogging from EcoVelo, a Rohloff-Equipped Surly Cross-Check.

rohloff_surly.jpg



11 Comments

Interesting though I do find it odd to have a rear hub that’s more expensive than the frame/fork. The double stem arrangement is no doubt functional but still looks dorky and fugly.

The Rohloff is an interesting design but I really don’t see any advantage except when you want to run a full chain case.

and that hub is going to outlast that frame . . .

“Interesting though I do find it odd to have a rear hub that’s more expensive than the frame/fork.”

For singlespeed/fixed that’s a reasonable point, but when we’re talking gears, shouldn’t the most complex component be the most expensive? It’s not as if the Cross Check is a weak frame. If I paid that much for a hub I’d want it to outlast a frame as well.

Also, in a crash the hub would more than likely survive (providing the flange doesn’t break) - a crashed frame isn’t usually recoverable (or safe) once bent out of shape, so why spend more than you need to if you’re happy with the feel of standard cromo?

Other advantages would be;

- sequential shifting (no redundant gears)

- thicker, stronger chain that will wear significantly less

- no chain suck, no dropped chains (providing you check the chain tension once a fortnight or so)

- no hanger to bend

- runs clean

- you can shift down while stopped

Hopefully JTek make Rohloff compatible bar end shifters like their potentially awesome Alfine/Nexus effort here.

<a href=“http://www.ecovelo.info/2009/01/16/jtek-alfinenexus-compatible-bar-end-shifter/” rel=“nofollow”><a href=“http://www.ecovelo.info/2009/01/16/jtek-alfinenexus-compatible-bar-end-shifter/” rel=“nofollow”><a href=“http://www.ecovelo.info/2009/01/16/jtek-alfinenexus-compatible-bar-end-shifter/” rel=“nofollow”><a href=“http://www.ecovelo.info/2009/01/16/jtek-alfinenexus-compatible-bar-end-shifter/” rel=“nofollow”><a href=“http://www.ecovelo.info/2009/01/16/jtek-alfinenexus-compatible-bar-end-shifter/” rel=“nofollow”><a href=“http://www.ecovelo.info/2009/01/16/jtek-alfinenexus-compatible-bar-end-shifter/” rel=“nofollow”><a href=“http://www.ecovelo.info/2009/01/16/jtek-alfinenexus-compatible-bar-end-shifter/” rel=“nofollow”>http://www.ecovelo.info/2009/01/16/jtek-alfinenexus-compatible-bar-end-shifter/</a></a></a></a></a></a></a>

If they could do it, I’d be the next in line for this set up. The whole thing is very much my bag (I’d rate my Schmidt dyno hub as my most rewarding component purchase).

Good tip on the J-Tek—we knew that was being worked on (we talk about drop-bar Nexus too much here) and great to see it out and on Ecovelo.  Note: I have no diss for the Surly, but it is what is. Conventional Bike shop wisdom would think that a customer purchasing a Rohloff would also purchase a more upscale frame like a Civia or Waterford or whatever.

“we talk about drop-bar Nexus too much here”

Really? Hadn’t noticed… :p

As for the frame stuff, I agree that the Surly isn’t spectacular, I’m just saying that you’d notice the difference between a Rohloff and the standard Crosscheck Tiagra setup long before you noted the difference between 4130 and Reynolds or Columbus.

Be sure to hit us all up with a review of the JTek kit if you get your hands on it!

As a Cross-Check rider, I have to disagree with that sentiment.

So far, my Cross-Check has been a 3-speed with flat bars, a mostly-Ultegra roadie with drops, and in its current incarnation, a fixie with Scott handlebars—all with the same basic light touring setup.  I have gone looking for other platforms that allow this kind of tinkering, but they don’t exist.

Riding a fixed gear with studs is really kicking my ass up hills and/or the flat trail on my way to work.  I’m absolutely checking out this Jtek shifter and for next winter.

The second stem is the least elegant approach to the Rohloff “nub” that I’ve seen. Again, no diss to the Cross-Check was intended at all. More a bit puzzling that someone would put a Rohloff on it. To the dual stem is a bit hard to say, “check my form and function out, dawg.” It’s more always answering “why do you have a second stem?”

“The second stem is the least elegant approach to the Rohloff “nub” that I’ve seen.”

Totally agree.

I’m guessing from the picture the owner got so sick of frozen derailleurs that they felt a bit of fugliness was warranted.

“I have gone looking for other platforms that allow this kind of tinkering, but they don’t exist.”

The Bianchi Volpe is an alright alternative. Definitely the blue and not the green though. There’s fugly, and then there’s metallic olive. Otherwise I think DL’s talking custom shop. Mmmm, XCr…

http://gallery.thylacinecycles.com/v/frames/-1.jpg.html

Otherwise the White Industries ENO hub is the great equaliser.

Until I looked at the blown-up photos on EcoVelo, I just assumed the Rohloff shifter was mounted to the auxillary stem/handlebar setup.  Nope, the shifting nubbin is mounted to the frame…so, the extra stem is an ugly and heavy alternative to a Minoura Space Bar, which is ideally suited to a setup like this for mounting lights below the bar.  Odd, indeed.

1) You use a Space Bar when you need more space, but this bike has like four floors of real estate on the steerer.  The second stem is going to be more stout than the space bar and doesn’t need to clamp to the handlebar.  Makes sense to me.

2) Jtek adapter.  Ever taken apart a Rohloff shifter? 2-cables and lots of wide-up.  Not gonna be easy to engineer a tidy little shifter like Jtek’s Nexus lever.  However, there is a twist shifter engineered to fit on a dropbar (forgot the name and where), but the two examples I’ve laid hands to didn’t please me.  But I didn’t set them up.

Mark, don’t you see that the only thing that extra stem and bar in the above photos are supporting is a pair of lights? 

A Space Bar can clamp around the middle body of the existing stem, and would be a perfect, much lighter and far less kludgy place to mount the shifter nubbin…or lights.  Mounting it that way doesn’t take up any valuable real estate on the handlebar tops, either.

Are you thinking of the Hubbub adapter to put a twist shifter onto the end of a drop bar?  That wouldn’t be so bad…but they are quite expensive for what they do.

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