New Puma Bikes

Puma Bikes launched 5 new bikes, designed by Biomega, including this BMX style, folder with a big basket.

Pico

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This will fire up Mark’s interest, considering the S&S BMX he built last year. Also see the Funk with flip-flop hubs and huge top tube.

PUMA_BIKES_FUNKGREY_100306_007.jpg

Bombastic marketing language aside (about re-inventing urban mobility), these bikes are certainly interesting; especially the Pico. They are shipping now and available online: ship to your home, dealer, or buy at dealer.



10 Comments

i wouldn’t call the Puma bike a “BMX” bike…it’s a “mini velo” in the traditional Japanese sense: an adult bike with small wheels.  Definitely not XTREME…

Never mind the couplings, my own bike is just barely in the BMX category since it has a multi-speed rear hub, but the majority of the components are straight up BMX. Not so with the Puma, nor is the geometry true BMX.

No, I could find a dozen or so bikes just like this outside a train station in Tokyo, just without the dayglow paint.

How are these being distributed?  I got the impression only some units were being sold in limited numbers in the actual puma stores so I’m assuming the others are supposed to be picked up by appropriate retailers?

What bike shop is going to touch these when they have a huge overlap with the far more expansive product lineups from Dahon and Brompton without the garish branding?

Or are they supposed to be picked up by general puma retailers? Can’t really see any of the bikes fitting in with the retail outlets that typically stock Puma and the brand is insanely popular here.

I find the urban outfitters forey into bikes a bit more interesting.

I sent Puma this thread. The press release said they’re doing the “buy it online and ship to your house, or shop, or at a dealer model.” On Facebook, a reader said the Pico was a rip-off of the [Raleigh Twenty](ttp://bikehugger.com/2009/07/on-the-ave-raleigh-twenty.html) and I don’t think so, as that bike itself was so “[ripped off](http://bikehugger.com/2007/08/old-school-folding-bike.html)”

Puma is describing it in their marketing as a BMX style bike, regardless I do think it’s interesting and they’ll market it well. A step-through frame? Sure, yes yes, but a bike with a hinge and horking basket that I bet handles very crisply is pretty cool.

there are a bazillion hinged mini velo bikes in asia, but as of yet “mini velo” isn’t a marketable label elsewhere.  “bmx styled” i guess could sorta fly, in the same way that putting a racing stripe on a ford fiesta would make it a rally car. so, yes, if it works then it’s great marketing. 

the term"urban” is more palatable to me, as that term is more vaguely defined.  i mean, it basically means a bike for the city, though there are plenty of trick riders, both fixie and freestyle BMX, who would probably wantt to constrict the definition to aggressive riding.

philosophically, the more i think about labels, the more i want to throw them all out, but my mechanic’s mind counters by saying that the equipment should match the intended use and the label should accurately reflect the equipment’s capabilities.  the right tool for the right job is best, but it’s okay to make do in a pinch.  but if i use the handle of a screwdriver to pound on something, i still wouldn’t call it a “hammer”

There are indeed and I’m seeing the first wave of them on bike paths. That’s the 70s wave of “Raleigh twenty” style under various names, including Bianchi. You know the mantra of this industry is what’s old is new, ‘cept when it comes to carbon layup, then it’s 17 different ways to describe: a bladder pushes the epoxy into the fibers, then it’s put into a autoclave.

I still want to know what the market for all these things is.  The predominant city bike here is the 70ies-80ies vintage Peugeot. From what I’ve seen the target price point for most people who want a functional commuter is around $200, hence the proliferation of those tough old bikes.

There is lots of stiff competition in the 700-1000$ market for bikes.

We’re meeting with Puma later in the week, but my guess is Puma customers that see the bike and/or not your typical bike shop customer.

I thought we already dismissed these bikes as being of shoddy construction about a year and a half ago:

http://bikehugger.com/2009/09/mark-vs-poop-on-wheels-puma-fi.html

That second picture looks really familiar. And my comments from back in 2009 still stand today: Puma- stick to figuring out plain-clothes cycling fashion (there’s a lot of room for you to find success there). Your bikes are diluting your brand name.

We did! The Pico and a fuller line is new. We do need to ride these. Related topic, seeing lots of Leaders on the road.

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