The Tour every 2 hours

Man, I just dig being able to turn on OLN and see the Tour every 2 hours. I’ll even watch a stage a few times, to catch something I missed, or just relish in the coverage, realizing I won’t see it again for another year. Seeing those marvelous graphical maps, I forgive OLN for gutting the Giro and Vuelta coverage. A few notes on this year’s coverage

  • Great to see OLN’s graphics, studio, and talent reaching ESPN 2 levels of quality
  • Trautwig seems less annoying, I even chuckled at two of his quips
  • Phil is not messing up all the names like he was earlier in the year
  • Paul always seems like he’s having a really good time
  • Does Bobke scare the casual viewer?

Considering that we’ll see the same commercials 10 million times before the end of the tour, I already can’t stand that Flowmax one. Flowmax should be the name of a carburetor and sorry, but guys are just never that happy together, in a convertible, hair blowing in their faces, singing hits from the 80s, happy that their piss flows. I also don’t care if Saab was born from jet engineers because none of them are around anymore, Saab is a division of GM (not Boeing), and Subaru makes some of their cars.

I love those Michelob commercials and think that if they can put an SRM on a bike and transmit the data that they could put a camera on a bike and capture a sprint from a rider’s view.



Whitelisting Commenters

Just turned on a new whitelisting feature for comments. We’re moderating all comments on Bike Hugger to prevent spam and we’re now “trusting” commenters and adding them to a whitelist. If you’ve been added to the list, your comment will go live immediately and not sit in the queue.



An answer from the commuters

After Byron’s Commuter Challenge post on Monday, it was funny to see an answer from the commuters Tuesday, on the BBC website, no less:

BBC NEWS | Magazine | Cycle warriors

It’s by a London commuter who has ditched the Tube in favor of cycling since the July 7 terrorist attacks in London.

He outlines the standard complaints (rude drivers, parked cars, “the thwack of a poorly-applied England flag as a car overtakes”) and cops to occasional misbehavior by riders, before blowing the lid off the “Great Race.”

The small number of cyclists who are in the know duel with great nonchalance and no acknowledgement of their opponent. The trick is to cycle at maximum speed until the point of overtaking, and then sit back in the saddle as you pass, looking straight ahead as if the mere breeze is carrying you forward. I even have a scoring system which gives double marks for passing anyone wearing Lycra. Overtaking a bike courier would theoretically score five, but I have never done it.

I’m pretty comfortable at the back of the pack, but even I would get demoralized if I was passed by a guy in a suit on a mountain bike.

Best reader reply is from “Simon:” “The first rule of The Great Race is that you never mention The Great Race.”



The Commuter Challenge

commuter challenge This time of year, with le Tour on, STP coming up, and the nice weather, more commuters and enthusiasts are out riding. I call it the commuter challenge when seemingly passive, recreational/commuting cyclists don’t like to be passed or chase you down, pass you, and want to compete across the bridge, up the hill, and down the bike path.

I think it’s the natural competitive spirit we all have, the bike brings it out, and it’s intensified when I’m kitted up in team gear. No team gear and the commuters don’t seem to care, but with the kit on it’s commuter challenge time. Pam reports the same thing when she rides into work and we’ve both decided to just sit on when a commuter challenge goes down, let that commuter pull you home or to work, and enjoy the ride.



Everyday Cycling

Looking for more news about the le Tour scandal on BBC Sport, I found that British Cycling has launched Everyday Cycling, a “brand new initiative that aims to appeal to the broad spectrum of leisure cyclists, from commuters and family cyclists through to mountain bikers and sportive riders.” Sounds just like Bike Hugger! In the states, we’ve got the League of American Cyclists “working for a bicycle friendly america” and in Seattle the Cascade Bicycle Club that do an amazing amount of work including the Seattle to Portland ride.

Also see Cycling for Health, a program sponsored by Group Health to get people out on their bikes hopefully everyday.



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