Frozen Tri-Flow and other 07 observations

Back from Maui, and unpacking the Modal, I learned that way below zero degrees Tri-flow freezes into a gelatinous mass. I guess the Modal was put in the unheated cargo hull of the plane, cause it came back cold and stiff, with a gooey-bottled-blob of dry lube.

That interesting lesson was one of many this year for Bike Hugger. Traveling all over the world with a bike certainly changes one’s perspective and also reaffirms a common thread of cycling everywhere. In all my travels, I’d meet someone that wanted to talk bikes with me and that includes broken English at a Beijing bike pit stop.


Bike Hugger started because we noticed

a surge in bike-to-work riders, a change in the air, a wisp of urban bikes, and spotted a long-tail, sport utility bike. I thought, ‘huh, something’s going on’

and didn’t exactly expect to sell retail goods, sponsor a team, features in Dwell and; or building this large of a community with steady, healthy traffic.

Thanks for being part of that and considering the community, please tell us what mattered to you in 07 … what do you think was the best of bike culture?

Brompton Factory Tour

Our 22nd Huggacast, and last one for 07, features a tour of Brompton’s Factory with Will Butler-Adams, Engineering Director. Brompton is the London-based designer and manufacturer of the Brompton folding bicycle and related accessories.

I posted earlier this month on riding a Brompton with their tech specialist, Rory Ferguson. The video features a discussion of all the parts that go into a Brompton, welding, wheel building, and assembly. The bike shown at the end, folded by my desk, is the one I brought home. It’s a new model with a rear frame clip and a snappy 2 speed drivetrain.


Times Columnists suggests decapitating cyclists, readers react

Sounds like Matthew Paris, a grumpy old times columnist, got up on the wrong side of his bed this year. In a satirical column entitled What’s smug and deserves to be decapitated? he goes on at some length about how in addition to all the normal atrocities associated with cyclists he’s now identified littering as enough to drive him to beheading unsuspecting riders as they zoom past. Some how I think Mr. Paris might be exaggerating a bit, but it’s interesting to see anti-cyclist sentiment in the media in London as well as in Seattle.

What’s really educational though are the comments (you may have to click the ‘read all … comments’ link yourself, sorry), almost uniformly pro-cyclist. It’s a refreshing change for me to see positive public reaction in the media.

City bikes gaining popularity with (celebrity) parents and kids

There are a lot of things to like in this photo: New Orleans, single speed city bikes, urban cycling, many (3!) kids in tow, and the fact that Brad Pitt seems to have adopted my habit of sticking ones tongue out when hauling a heavy load. Most of all I’m encouraged that cycling culture can get a bit of a plug from the celebrities of the day.

Too bad about the helmets though. Maybe the Pitt-Jolies can use a bit of their celebri-clout to engender more stylish helmets in the future. Links back to where the story came from (thanks Reno-Rambler!). I blame the Ibob folks (background reading on the Bobs) for pointing me in the right direction.

Maui Rides

The wet, windy, and stormy weather shortened most of our Maui rides and made the trip to Hana and back downright brutal at times, especially when climbing. The road conditions make for tense riding because it’s slick and unpredictable. Where you’d normally slice through the s-curves, with body english and power to the pedals, the red clay-slicked road means your riding with the bike upright and very carefully – clay buildup is also a problem. Riding Maui in the rain, beats 40 degrees in Seattle, but it’s still rain.


The traffic is the usual in Maui – lots of it – with the addition of construction everywhere. Once you get about 5 miles out from a town, it’s no problem, but gridlock on an island, during a vacation is especially annoying. So far we’ve ridden

  • Haiku to Hana, Highway 360 – 70 miles, 3:15 (one way), tough climbing in the wind, rain, and slick conditions.
  • Napili to the Bread Stand, Highway 30 – 35 miles, 3:00, constantly up and down, torrential downpour and clay runoff during the ride back. Mr. Steepy is always hard.
  • Kihei to Napili, Highway 31 – Highway riding, mostly flat, but wind means small chain ring for most of it. During a 5 mile stretch, I was going 28 mph without pedaling, with a tailwind.
  • Around Napili and Lahaina, Highway 30 – the condo loop, about 45 minutes on the highway and trafficked roads.

For those readers into training and racing, I ride Maui for base miles at sub threshold. You can certainly go harder, but the steady, swirling winds and undulating terrain are very good to ride a heart rate tempo. It’s also surprising how hard a gentle climb is when facing the trade winds. Also, considering the wind and terrain, I ride time and not miles.

Quick Stats

  • 20 hours
  • 16,000 ft of climbing
  • 148 avg heart rate

Modal Geared

The Modal in geared mode performed as expected – very well. It’s built for performance riding and adept at climbing, cornering, and all-day riding. The Ti frame is comfortable, precise, and controlled with minimal road vibration and shock (as you’d expect from a quality Ti frame, built by Bill Davidson). I’ll adjust the sliders for more road clearance and swap cassettes to a 27 next time.

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