Click: The Hershey’s Kiss of Multi-Tools

click%20tool.jpg Lookie at what I got here: a “Click” multi-tool.

It’s tiny, has 2/3/4/5/6mm allen wrenches, flat and Phillips head screwdrivers, and a keychain ring. The tools are all chrome-vanadium steel with aluminium sides. Granted, the Click’s size prevents you from being able to hoss on a bolt, but on today’s high-performance bikes there are few bolts that require massive torque (for instance, stems clamping on carbon handlebars). Apart from it’s size and quality of the materials, the best thing about the Click is the $5 retail price.

Distributed by Cyclone.

Snow Bikes

China is getting hammered by the worst weather in 50 years and with millions of people riding bikes, that’s creating lots of chaos. Sure, in Seattle we’re weather wusses compared to Canada or other really cold places, but I don’t think any of us have it this bad …


AP Photo by Eugene Hoshiko.

Bamboo Bike

We posted on bamboo bikes previously, but not a bike carrying bamboo … and a lot of it.


Yield to Life

Yield to Life is a new campaign founded and fronted by US Pro Dave Zabriskie. The site has some well-constructed articles on how to act properly on your bike to stay safe. The 10 Safety Tips For Motorists should be a must-read for all drivers…but oh well. I’ve pasted the Cyclist Tips below:

From: 10 Safety Tips for Cyclists

1. Cycling Citizenship
Along with the right to cycle come responsibilities. Familiarize yourself with all applicable traffic laws and cycling rules. Each state has its own set; be aware of them. Motorists will be much more willing to accept cyclist’s rightful place on the road if cyclists act lawfully and respectfully. Do not run stop signs or red lights or use the wrong side of the street. It is best and safest to ride single file. If you are not blocking traffic and if the laws in your state permit it, there are times it is safe to ride two abreast. However, on narrow curvy canyon roads it is always best to ride single file. Riding responsibly will do wonders towards easing tensions and fostering a more harmonious environment between motorists and cyclists.

2. Right On
It is generally either illegal or unsafe to ride on a sidewalk or on the road towards oncoming traffic. As a rule, it is best to ride in the direction of traffic, staying as far to the right as is practical. However, make sure there is room to handle emergencies and that you do not ride so close to the right that you run the risk of hitting the curb and being thrown into traffic. There are times when you simply cannot stay to the far right”whether it’s to overtake another cyclist or vehicle, to make a left turn, or to avoid a hazard. Be sure to wait for a safe opportunity and use the proper hand signals when you take a lane.

3. Join In
If you are traveling at the same speed as other traffic, it may be safer to jump in and ride with traffic; because, this may make you more visible to motorists. Joining traffic is sometimes necessary because the road is simply too narrow for both a bike and a car. It is a particularly good idea to take a lane and join traffic before an intersection to make your presence known”especially for right-turning drivers who may not see you as they start their turn.

When you do join traffic, make sure you never pass on the right. This is always dangerous, but particularly so in an intersection. By waiting directly behind a vehicle, you can see a car’s signals; otherwise, you never know if the motorist is about to make a right turn and hit you.

4. Use Your Head
Regardless if you’re going to the corner store or heading out on a marathon ride, always wear a helmet. Make sure it is properly fastened and fitted. (The helmet should fit snugly and not move when you shake your head.)

5. Seeing Eye to Eye
Make eye contract with drivers whenever possible. This ensures that the motorists see you and helps you assert your rightful place on the road. This œpersonal connection reminds motorists that you are indeed real LIFE in need of attention and protection. Once you make that connection, motorists may give you more respect on the road.

6. The Road Straightly Traveled
Try to ride consistently and predictably. For instance, at an intersection, do not veer into the crosswalk and then suddenly reappear on the road again. Don’t thread through parked cars. With such erratic behavior, motorists will not be aware of your presence when you try to re-emerge into traffic. (Inconsistent conduct increases your chances of being squeezed out of traffic or, worse, getting hit.)

7. Playing Defense
Make sure you are always aware of your surroundings. Know what is behind you and watch out for what is in front of you. Always be on the lookout for road hazards; sand and gravel, glass, railroad tracks, parked cars, snow and slush can wreak havoc on you and your bike. Sewer grates and cracks in the road can catch your wheel and cause you to be thrown from the bike. Watch for parked cars where people may be opening doors on the driver side of the vehicle without looking. Always wait until you have ample time to make your move, whether you are changing a lane or turning a corner. Do not expect to be granted the right of way in any instance.

8. Flaunt It
Make your presence felt. Wear bright color clothing. At night or in inclement weather, it is important to use reflective lights in the front, side and rear that make you visible from all directions.

9. Helping Hands
Emergencies happen. Be prepared. Always make sure you have at least one hand on your handlebars, no matter what. Know and use your hand signals whenever you are changing lanes or making a turn.

10. Brake Away
Make sure your brakes are always in top-notch condition. Be aware of how weather and road conditions can effect your ability to brake.

You want this kid’s bike!


Ever notice how Lady Fortune has a brutal sense of humour? I’m at the Lapierre Cycles presentation. Seattle Bike Supply and Lapierre had a raffle for a Lapierre X.Lite cyclocross frameset, and who wins it? This little kid named Reuben (see picture left). Yes, of course, Reuben’s dad is the real lucky one, but I’m still ticked that he used his kid to win. I mean, I thought I was clever using my girlfriend’s ticket to improve my odds but clearly I was outsmarted. Next time I’ll need to bring in a daycare center or some homeless people to get more raffle tickets in my hands. Don’t I deserve swag?

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