Mark@CES

Mark the photog at CES – with me waiting for the Gates Keynote. Posts to follow …

from the Bike Hugger Photostream.



Bike Hugger @ CES

mid.jpg Next week, Bike Hugger is back in Vegas to blog the Consumer Electronics Show. We’re there on the cycling tip and looking for relevant technology from Intel and others. Mobile Internet Devices are expected to dominate the show, like we talked about in the Ultra Mobile Bike Devices and Bicycle Hi Fi posts.

Any bike-related technologies that you readers are interested in seeing? Like messengers monitoring air pollution with cellphones and cargo bikes … .

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Opening Day: Cold Feet on the Cargo Bike ride

I managed to get away from sick-kid-care just long enough to get stated on this years Opening Day Cargo Bike Ride. Great day for a ride, the weather was pleasant enough for very light clothing, and the xtracycle made it possible to haul almost all the extras. Despite a very social pace, my cargo (6 yr old daughter) veto’d the ride just a few blocks in. Note to self: Dressing pedal people and cargo people are two very different tasks. After the ride I’m wondering when cargo bikes will start designing a cargo-people experience in from the get-go.

We’ve had a bit of a go of it around our house, round robin illness to beat the band. Between that, New Years hang-over, and a half-way complete fork replacement on my xtracycle I figured I would never make the cargo-bike ride. But, I managed to rally on the fork replacement (thanks to some help from the Local Bike Shop), and got everything back together. Hang overs were kept light by a mellow evening on the 31st and my kid said she was in for a Bike Parade after some time on the playground with friends.

The sky was more hung over than me, with grey clouds crowding the horizon BUT: No wind, temperatures in the low 40s, all in all a very temperate day for a ride. Nice crowd at Greenlake for the ride, including many xtracycles, a rickshaw, a swiss military bike + trailer for a small artillery piece carrying a stove and other goodies, and many other choice rides. I was very comfortable in my spring clothing: arm warmers, a wind jacket, jeans. Hauling cargo on the big bike is enough to keep anybody warm even down in the 40s. Regardless I brought along my big winter gloves, an extra warm jacket, scarf and various sundries for the 6 yr old, but didn’t give enough though to what kind of experience my passenger might have.

J. (the 6 year old) still wasn’t feeling that well when I picked her up from a play-date with some friends, and immediately started negotiating for a foreshortened ride and asking for a jacket for her legs. We agreed to doing half the ride, and I put my extra jacket on her. This was her first time riding in the bobike/peapod kid carrier, usually she rides on the back but I didn’t have time to set up her stoker stem. We had a good time socializing the peloton, meeting a couple of other youngsters on the ride and being suitably impressed by anybody willing to bring a becack (bicycle rickshaw) out on a winter day.

We left the park, becack in the lead, at an extremely brisk pace for a rickshaw, or an extremely reasonable pace for a long bike. We were slowed by a mechanical just a mile or so into the ride, and the sounds from the back made it evident that the jacket was doing OK for the legs but not the feet of my passenger. Just a few blocks later there was enough noise from the back to be clear that J. wasn’t comfortable and needed to head home, so head home we did. When we arrived we had a bit of left over black eyed peas and greens – the braised country style ribs got finished on new years eve. Then a warm bath for J.

In the future, particularly in the colder weather I need to pay closer attention to how my passengers are dressed. Hauling people around on a bike is enough work to keep you warm in many conditions. Sitting on the back just isn’t. J. sometimes asks to ride on the trail-a-cycle just so she can pedal, and I wonder if the ability to work up a bit of warmth isn’t part of the incentive.

Kids are the most frequent and most precious cargo I carry. Some of the cargo bikes (Bakfiets comes to mind) make passengers a priority but most of the long-bike kid carry capabilities I’ve seen seem more like second thoughts that integrated designs. The analogy I’m thinking of is the difference between a truck and a mini-van. Both are big and can carry a lot of crap, but one’s much friendlier for passengers.

I expect the Long Bike, City Bike, and Cargo Bike categories to take on more life in the next couple of years. Passengers on cargo bikes face special challenges – moving fast but not exerting themselves, staying and feeling secure, etc. It’d be great to see more passenger friendly features designed ‘up front’ in these newer versions, even if they come as optional packages from the store. How about some integrated handlebars? Better foot and leg protection, (both for wheels and wind)? Maybe an integrated ‘scooter’ blanket for passenger bottom halves? Back supports? Easier entry/exit?

Take that becack from the cargo ride as an extreme example of passenger centered design – it even has a roof! Clearly that’s too far for a general purpose utility bike, but designing in options for 10-30% of that functionality would be a big win.

Sorry, no photos, I was brought my camera but didn’t have a chance to take any snaps. Next time, next time.



My Girlfriend’s Bike..pt 3

kappa%2004.jpg My girlfriend and I went for a ride today. Nothing too stressful, just playing around on the bikes. I’m trying to build her up so that we can get around town together via cycling.

I added the final touches to her bike. I switched out the tired Avid brake with an XT 760 V-brake. The “parallel push” linkage really makes it a lot easier to tune out the pads. Also, the bike now has Odyssey Race hubs that I laced to Rhino Lite rims. If I had the money, I would have built the wheels on Shimano DXR hubs, the Odyssey hubs are okay. The bike weighs 26.5 lbs, at least 10lbs less than her old Schwinn cruiser.

Eventually, we’ll get a Schwinn Stingray seat and then send the frame to get repaired (got the frame used; a brake post is buggered and the head tube was over-reamed) and painted.

kappa%2003.jpg



Batavus Flying D

Starting the new year out right, with a sunny winter day, I test rode the Batavus Flying D – D could stand for Dutchman, but definitely not dainty!

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This bike is big, sturdy, heavy (not in a bad heavy way, but good), and rolls – just like you’d expect a Dutch bike to do. At one point, I just rode right over speed bumps and let the big wheels, tires, and sprung seat take the abuse.

I was riding in style, upright and certain the bike would get me to where I was going. The bike rides like a urban cruiser, with wide, 26” rims and big, durable tires. It’s a curious, setback, relaxed, and upright ride and that’s in the rake of the fork. That’s hard to describe, but ride one and you’ll get what I’m saying …

A Sachs (now SRAM) 7 speed internal hub with coaster brake drives the bike with simple shifting and braking control. A coaster brake is like the brake you had on your bikes as a kid, you kick back your heel to slow the rear.

The bike is the beefier and bigger brother of the Lightning I reviewed earlier and also really dug. These bikes are heirloom bikes. Meaning, you’ll have it for the rest of your life and hand it down for generations.

The Flying D ships with

  • Brooks B67 leather saddle and matching leather grips
  • Wheel lock
  • Auto-on/off lights
  • Fenders

and the MSRP is $1,049.99. I rode the men’s version and I was remarkably able to climb up the steep hill back to Hugga HQ. The women’s version drops the tob tube.

Check with your local Independent Bike Dealer for a test ride. On the next ride with the Flying D, I’ll commute to downtown Seattle and back.

Notes

Roller brake corrected to coaster brake.



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