Epic Beef Bar Prank

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by Byron on Mar 28, 2014 at 11:43 AM

Epic Beef Bar


Someone at Hugga HQ must’ve overheard me talking about Issue 11 of our Magazine and the April Fools theme, ‘cause in the bar drawer was this beef-flavored one. I guess the plan was during a sun break, I’d just grab a bar and go, in a hurry before it squalled again. Then the prankster imagined the horrible reaction of me tearing open a Beef Habanero Cherry Bar and taking a bite. That’s like chocolate-flavored anything on an hot day or that one time Clif released premixed drinks that tasted like a locker room smells.

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Friction Drilling

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by Mark V on Mar 28, 2014 at 10:34 AM

This is how they make the holes in Mavic Ksyrium SL rims and other similar rims where the nipples thread directly into the rim. It’s called friction drilling. Rather than having a metal bit that bites into the work piece and removes material in its path, friction drilling uses a fast-spinning conical bit that is pressed hard to the piece. The friction heats the material which flows out of the way of the bit. The friction drill bit must be made of a heat resistant material like cemented carbide (I mean, all good drill bits are made of heat resistant material, but this is way beyond cobalt steel). The advantage is that the process creates a hole with material left around the circumference; then that material can be tapped with threads for the spoke nipple.

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Obliteride 2014: Riding with Jim

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by Byron on Mar 27, 2014 at 8:13 AM


The Obliteride is back for 2014, with new, improved routes and we’re planning on riding along again. Last year it was a good time and I observed

Obliteride is a local story: from the routes, people, and monies raised for the Hutch. The orange is also not yellow. The focus on the experience was appreciated by all the riders we talked to and rode with; especially, the Franti concert I captured with Glass.

The Franti concert was a highlight for sure and all the dedicated cyclists I met. This August 8-10 I want to ride with Dr. Jim Olson, who’s a Fred Hutch researcher and developing ways to treat cancers with nature – scorpions, sunflowers and violets. Hope to see Jim on the 150 mile route. I heard he’s an avid cyclist. See his Tedx talk.

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SRAM Guide Brakes for the Trail

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by Byron on Mar 26, 2014 at 5:06 PM


Confused by what a “trail brake” is compared to another brake, I asked SRAM’s Duncan Riffle and he said

When we use the term “trail” brake or any other specified discipline it has to do with intended use for that product. IE. A Trail brake would be suitable for a wide range of short to mid travel bikes that require a light-weight, robust and powerful package to get the job done in many scenarios. Where as a “Downhill” specific brake would be less concerned about weight and more about power, modulation and durability in extreme conditions…

Ok! Still unclear if you ride trails on bikes in spandex or baggies or spandex INSIDE baggies? Will figure that out later this year when we get on the dirt. As I understand and it was explained to me by Sean Estes, technically trail braking is a technique where you use your rear brake to set the attitude of the bike going into a corner. However trail brakes are brakes designed specifically for Trail riding as opposed to say XC or DH-specific brakes. The “Trail” experience sits between XC and All-Mtn, meaning roughly 110-140 mm travel, relative light weight, all-around geometry and equally good at going up or down.

Yep and I rode a sweet bike for the trail last year up to Searle Pass on the Colorado Trail. It was a Camber S-Works with a 1 X.

Camber

A Camber for the trail

Searle Pass

Up to Searle Pass

sweet singletrack

On Singletrack

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Chris Cross

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by Byron on Mar 25, 2014 at 1:23 PM

Another bike edit and this one is with Chris Akrigg on a Mongoose riding over pretty much everything a MTB would. What CX racers run over, he rode.

A lot to be learned technically from riding a cross bike, have to be on point 110% of the time, I had a lot of fun putting this together.

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How The Race Was Won - Milan-Sanremo 2014

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by Byron on Mar 24, 2014 at 1:01 PM

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Inspired In Barcelona

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by Byron on Mar 24, 2014 at 12:31 PM


We’ve ridden in Barcelona too and were inspired then and now. Ali Clarkson, Sean Watson, Danny MacAskill and guest rider Duncan Shaw ride some of the unique spots in Barcelona in this edit. Our time there wan’t free styling, but observing the Magnificent Streets, Folding Bikes, and Roundabouts in Girona.

Spain 06

A Spanish Intersection in 06

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Fix It Sticks In Your Pocket and Workbench

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by Byron on Mar 22, 2014 at 8:27 AM

Fixit Sticks

On the Workbench

After getting the latest PR about a return to Kickstarter and another launch, I asked Brian Davis the Founder of Fix It Sticks what was going on. He told me

Fix It Sticks returns to Kickstarter to launch their all new replaceable line of tools. Last year the company came to life making 2 sticks with permanently installed bits that interlock to form a T-wrench. Now they return to bring a more flexible line of tools that have replaceable bits.

So that’s a Fixit Stick for your pocket – we put ours in tool rolls – and the work bench. the Fix It Sticks Replaceable Edition is on Kickstarter for $30 per set (expected MSRP: $36) which includes 8 bits total and a recycled inner tube pouch. Also releasing the all new Fix It Sticks T-Way Wrench which is a permanent T-wrench for shop use and comes with 7 bits for $25 (expected MSRP $30). Both tools have powder coating options in case you want to color match with your bikes.

Brian added

With manufacturers using all sorts of different hexes and Torx fittings today this platform makes sense. Rather than buy all new tools riders can just grab a bit from any hardware store. They are past the funding goal, so these tools will be a reality soon, but the discount through the pre-order process is a good incentive to back to the project.

The Kickstarter campaign is here and you can pre-order on the their website too. The original version is also on Amazon.

In the Tool roll

In the tool roll

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Milano-San Remo 1992: The Legend of Sean Kelly

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by Mark V on Mar 21, 2014 at 8:28 AM

This weekend is the first really big professional road race on the calendar, Milano-San Remo. Up until now, it’s roughly been the equivalent of spring training, but Milano-San Remo is the first race of the year that really, really counts. It’s got history; it’s a race that the racers’ fathers’ fathers dreamed of winning. It’s got scenery, speeding along the Italian coast in the first rays of spring. It’s long, at almost 300km/185miles. And it’s got speed. The only climbs are relatively shallow and come late in the race, and M-SR would almost be easy if the peloton weren’t just drilling it for more than six and a half hours before they get to the 3km finishing straight in San Remo. The race usually ends in a bunch sprint, but on occasion a wily racer can keep a gap off the last climb, the Poggio, since the descent is sinuous and narrow.

In 1992, the Ariostea team’s leader Moreno Argentin stormed up the Poggio, breaking free of his rivals well before the crest of the climb. The veteran Italian would keep his lead all the way down the descent that emptied into the finishing straight, where he would celebrate his first win at Milano-San Remo.

Or at least he would have if Sean Kelly hadn’t absolutely blistered the Poggio’s descent. We are talking LEGENDARY. It’s not that Argentin wasn’t making a fast descent, though he was being a bit conservative. No, it’s that Kelly was brilliant. He wasn’t even the at the front of the chasers at the crest of hill, but he leaves them all behind like they had opened parachutes. Kelly is on Argentin’s wheel right as they entered the straight, and even at 36yrs of age the former TdF green jersey winner still packed a formidable sprint. It was Kelly’s second M-SR win and the last major win of his illustrious career.

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Celeb Framebuilder Swears off Award Shows

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by Byron on Mar 20, 2014 at 11:26 AM

Brando Warhol

A builder like Brando

He’s got the longest waitlist of them all (waitlists are how framebuilders measure their worth in this game) and stayed home from the annual framebuilder pageant. The backchannel chatter about NAHBS (North American Handbuilt Bike Show) was more negative this Spring than most shows. I’ll leave the why that is for the people that were there, but this is like Brando swearing off award shows ‘cause it’s not about the art.

Most Y2K framebuilders couldn’t work without a cad program. Or design a frame without a misfitter. Many couldn’t produce a frame without a dedicated fixture, or measure “straight” without a two ton granite table. There’s a whole subculture that goes online and asks OTHER framebuilders how to add braze-ons, what tubes to use, and what brazing rod to buy. These guys aren’t building something as much as they’re assembling material based on a set of instructions. And who among them still makes his own forks?! Things have changed, alright.

Well of course it isn’t. I also don’t expect Sachs to get fat and wear a muumuu, but he does fashion himself as a celeb. One trained in the craft and not playing to some scripted reality show.

Ignore the best lug or ironic facial hair awards and find a builder near you. The best ones I know don’t seek the limelight. They just make bikes, like this one by Bill Davidson and Mark V…

D-Plus in the Gulley

D-Plus outfitted for gravel with those Sammy Slicks

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