Surviving A One-Day STP

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by Kelli on Jul 17, 2007 at 9:45 PM

<img src=”http://kellidiane.smugmug.com/photos/random.mg?AlbumID=3160397&Size=Thumb&rand=2396” align=right”>After my half-assed approach to last year’s two-day ride, I wasn’t entirely convinced that the One Day Rider patch I coveted so much would actually be worth the time and training required. By the time spring came around, I had hung up my running shoes and decided that this was the year.

So how does one go about surviving two hundred miles on a bike? Glad you asked. Read on for the answers to the most common questions I’ve gotten throughout training and after the finish.

  • What distance did you train up to before the double?

    I leveraged the Cascade Training Series rides to get in most of my longer rides, working up from 40 miles and topping out at 130 before STP. The most difficult part of training long mileage is planning food and water stops without having to carry too much with you. And without knowing many of the back roads well, I relied heavily on the well planned CTS rides to get in my saddle time. While it’s important to train your legs for the distance, the real trouble comes in training the rest of your body. 12 hours is a very long time for your back and shoulders to be reaching, while your butt rests precariously upon a narrow seat and starts chafing in your bike shorts. Once one passes the 130-150 mile marks, the legs are the least of your worries.

  • What did you learn from last year’s ride?

    I learned that taking preventative pain killer can be the difference between a difficult ride and a horrible ride. On the route, I took some at the midpoint and again at mile 140 to keep my rear end in check.

  • What would you recommend for a first-time one-day rider?

    Learn to ride in a group. Really, that goes for any first-time STPer (one or two-day), but is extremely important for the one-day riders. 204 miles is a really long way and there’s little chance of making it completely on your own. Learn to leverage pacelines, start training with your own group that plans to ride together. Drafting is extremely helpful in keeping not only your pace, but also your spirits, up. I’ll be honest, this was difficult for me. Prior to STP I’ve only joined small pacelines and never really felt comfortable. But when I realized somewhere around mile 75 that I was keeping a 21 mph pace and only working at what felt to be a 14 mph pace…I was sold. Save your legs for the long haul, take your turn at the front and get comfortable being surrounded by other cyclists.

  • What was the worst part of the course?

    Highway 30. Long, monotonous, lonely and getting darker. As a one-day rider the crowd had thinned out long before crossing into Oregon and I was feeling the fatigue set in.

  • Would you do a one-day again?

    Definitely, though it’s a tough call. I missed the camaraderie and culture that comes with meeting fellow cyclists during the overnight. But the extra effort required to finish the one-day ride is well worth not having to get up the following day and ride another 100 miles on a sore butt.

Overall, the ride was great and the patch well worth the effort. I entered this year’s season in far better shape than last year and felt pretty well trained in the last couple of weeks before the ride. That said, this is absolutely an approachable ride. With some commitment, training and discipline, nearly anyone can finish a one-day STP. It’s perfectly alright to not ever want to finish a double-century in one day. But wanting it badly enough is enough to take you the rest of the way.

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Super Stylin’ Socks

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by Byron on Jul 17, 2007 at 8:06 AM

The socks are in, as shown here by our sexy professional male model (ok, that’s actually just me), and are shipping now directly from Hugga HQ. In a week or so, Amazon.com will fulfill them for us.

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SockGuy custom made the socks for us in one size fits most (sizes 7-11). They feature 75% Ultra-wicking Micro Denier Acrylic, 15% Nylon, and 10% Spandex for exceptional comfort and strength. The comfort was confirmed yesterday during a tough tour of the Olympic Pennisula.

The socks sell for 9.95 and join our shirts in the Hugga Comfort line. Next up are jerseys and kits …

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Masi Speciale Fixed

8

by Byron on Jul 16, 2007 at 12:48 PM

Check the Masi Guy’s blog for preview photos of the new Masi fixie

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Mama Chari rides on by

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by Byron on Jul 16, 2007 at 11:05 AM

Not specifically bike-related news, but check the striking photo of a mama chari passing a minivan crushed by a house in the NYTimes today.

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(Photo credit Franck Robichon/European Pressphoto Agency)

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Critical Mass Paradox

4

by Byron on Jul 16, 2007 at 7:19 AM

Critical Mass is a paradox. In Manhattan, there’s nothing but turmoil and in Seattle a knife was pullled during the last one or arrests get made. In Brooklyn, for 3 years now, they’ve critically masssed with no arrests, no tickets, and the NYPD is even called “friendly.” StreetFilms just published a short film on the subject. I’ve only ridden a Critical Mass once, by accident (all kitted up with my race bike, feeling totally out of place) and it was fun and festive with tall bikes, longtail bikes, old schwinns, and everything else.

In Arizona, the next Critical Mass is on July 21st where they’ll meet around 6:30 pm at @ Tempe Beach park and ride to the Lost Leaf Tavern at 5th & Roosevelt. After the mass they’ll alleycat race with the winner taking all in the fixed race. Don’t know if they’re friends or foes with the police there.

Surprisingly, I saw a teaser for an Evening Magazine (of all places), on the alleycats, but it’s not linked yet. For more info on the alleycat in Arizona, email fixedgearhead69@gmail.com.

Comment on the paradox between peaceful protests and ones that turn ugly?

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One-Day Rider Patch; Check

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by Kelli on Jul 15, 2007 at 10:30 PM

With my heart set on a One-Day Rider patch after last year’s STP, I rode into Portland last night to claim my prize. 204 incredible miles and I cannot believe that I survived without so much as a flat tire. Complete ride review will be posted in the next couple of days. For now, congrats to the many other STPers out there this weekend and many, many, many thanks to all the Cascade staff and volunteers.

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Photo of the day: Borat at the Tour

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by Byron on Jul 15, 2007 at 11:37 AM

Borat makes an appearance at the Tour de France motivating the riders to pedal a few strokes harder or at least forget their pain while laughing (where’s the Angel to purge that scene from our minds?). Here’s another shot.

What’s your favorite crazy fan? Spiderman from last year was good, as well as hook ‘em horns from 2 years ago – the guy with the long-horn hat that’d run next to Lance.

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(Photo credit FRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images)

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Seattle Struggles with Road Diet

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by Byron on Jul 14, 2007 at 5:59 PM

Seattle is already struggling with its road diet and this week the Cascade Bicycle Club, Seattle Pedestrian Advisory Board, Seattle Bicycle Advisory Board, Fremont Neighborhood Council and many others, including Bike Huggers, called on the Mayor to intervene.

The urgent call to the Mayor resulted from the Fremont Chamber of Commerce successfully blocking new bike lanes on Stoneway that would have linked to the Burke-Gilman Trail.

A neighborhood that considers itself the “center of the universe” apparently thinks that universe is car-centric with fat, clogged roads.

What’s your thoughts on the Master Plan and Road Diets?

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