Ultra Mobile Bike Devices

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by Byron on Sep 19, 2007 at 3:50 PM

While Intel announces all sorts of the “new” at the Intel Developer Forum, I’m thinking “does this tech apply to bikes?”

Sure we’ve got heart rate monitors, trip and speed computers, power meters, GPS, but I’m thinking an iPod bike or ultra-mobile PC that I can pop into a basket on my urban bike, like the BenQ.

There’s a Nike+iPod, why not a bike?

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Why I ride fixed

6

by Dave R. on Sep 19, 2007 at 3:37 PM

“So you can’t coast on that?” The question comes up pretty often. My bike is usually out in front of my desk and folks catch on pretty quick that there’s something odd about it. No shifters, no corncob, no derailleurs. The question comes up after the explanation, and it almost always boils down to “why?”. I know it’s been said before many times, many ways – here’s my go…

I’m trying to be less of a man. I’ll admit it, I’m more of a man than I’d like to be. Twenty pounds less would be a good start. Commuting is part of my fitness regiment (something no *ov rider can say), and I ride fixed to make sure I get the most out of my commute. Cycling is a fantastic sport which creates incredible athletes, but for those of us schlubs who aren’t in it to win it there are just too many opportunities to coast. Even when I ride freewheel bikes I get all sweaty, so let’s just go whole hog and pedal the whole way to work, eh? One of the biggest jaw-droppers for folks is not the no-coasting thing but the single-gear thing. I’ll definitely loose out to the gal who’s can shift down to climb the tall ones (and I have). To my mind, mashing the pedals to get to the top is a special kind of locomotive resistance training. My only other option is to swallow my pride, climb off, and push it and that’s pretty good incentive even for me.

Fast I’m not sure what it is, exactly, but I’m fast on my fixed bikes. I’m not top-speed fast, and I’m certainly not race fast, but I can really move along on my bike and I almost never have to set my mind to it. Part of it is that I’m used to keeping the pressure on. On a fixie if you™re not keeping up with the bike you’re slowing it down and so the habit of at least keeping pace grows. I also have a very good feel for just how hard I’m pushing, and how much more I’ve got to give when the next hill comes along. I also think it’s just a lot less fucking around. I’m never waiting for the chain to re-engage on the right sprocket or shifting down, I’m not winding the cranks back around for a good start, etc.

Silent and Stylish This is probably my favorite part – there’s almost no noise from my bike. When my chain’s cleaned up the loudest noise coming from my ride is the sound of my tires on the road. Cycling’s often described as flying like a bird, and I just can’t imagine birds creaking and crunching through the sky like some of the bikes I hear.

There’s no doubt that the clean appearance of fixed bikes is a big draw for lots of folks, me too. But fixie style goes way past the clean appearance. I’d go so far to say that it’s an anti-gear aesthetic, although the fixie hipsters are putting a lot more attention into the gear on their bikes than a lot of my fellow commuters (check out those pink deep-v rims why don’t cha!). Something about winnowing your bike down to real core elements and using them well. I’m far from a fixie hipster, but I do hope a teeny tiny bit of fixie charm rubs off on me. I could use it.

Not all my rides are fixed, mind you. I can’t see any reason to punish myself with a cargo bike that can’t go up hills or coast down them. And a quick run around the South of Seatac mountain bike course was all it took to convince me of the wisdom of bringing gears and a freewheel. But, for my money, nothing’s quite as satisfying as flying home on my fixed bike.

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Belt Drives

4

by Byron on Sep 19, 2007 at 2:19 PM

belt_drive.jpg Belt drives are like corduroy and Ska – they come in and out of fashion, like very 15 years or so, and this year belt-drives are back (maybe the Mighty Mighty Bosstones are planning a reunion or we can at least remember what it was like before No Doubt).

So here’s Bill Davidson holding a Delta CDrive for a project bike. He’s planning on building “a clean, oil-free bike that you can put together in a hotel room, or quickly break it down when the bike racks are full on a bus.”

A belt-drive single-speed will debut at Interbike, Ellsworth’s Signature Ride is belt-driven, and the Bicycle Design blog is pondering belt-driven design.

As belt-drives come and go, what do you think? For Urban Bikes, seems to make sense, unless it’s wet and they slip.

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Bike Friendly SLUT in Seattle

8

by Dave R. on Sep 18, 2007 at 3:20 PM

Trolly.jpg Great news on the future of Seattle’s neighborhood transportation– you’ll be allowed to bring your bike on when you ride the SLUT (don’t worry, the link is work-safe). According to the Seattle DOT, bikes will be allowed in the center of the South Lake Union Trolleys Streetcars. The unfortunate acromyn for the new coaches wouldn’t be so bad if the coaches themselves were a bit more, erm, attractive. The photos on the SDOT site look faintly like a train of elongated orange daleks. I’m sure that’s not their final design though, right?

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PBP - SLEEP? what is this sleeping you speak of?

0

by Andy Tetmeyer on Sep 18, 2007 at 2:04 PM

When I got to Carhaix, the last checkpoint before Brest, I had been awake for 29 hours. I had never been awake that long before, much less ridden 300+ miles at the same time. In spite of latching onto a tandem I was still having a pretty miserable time. At that point I would have told anyone thinking of doing this ride to run screaming and never think of it again. Various scenarios were running through my head, and they all involved abandoning and catching a train back to Paris or cutting the ride short. Can I just turn around here? carry on to Brest and catch a TGV back to Paris from there?

I ate some food at the school cafeteria and decided to get some sleep. I’d figure out how to best bail out when I woke up.

Sleeping at PBP is really organized. As I have explained, the checkpoints are all at schools, and there are sleeping areas at most of the checkpoints. Either there are cots set up in the gym, or gym mats on the floor in classrooms. You follow the signs for “dormir” and come to a table staffed by a handful of locals. Though I speak very little french, it was obvious to me that there was an age requirement to be a Dormir staffer - you had to be at least 60 years old, preferably older. Anyways, you can rent a cot or mat and army surplus type wool blanket for 3 or 4 euro. You sign your name and frame number and tell the staff what time you want to be woken up. Then you grab your gear, take off your cleats (so as not to wake the other sleepers) and with a tiny flashlight one of the old guys leads you to a numbered spot where you can get a few hours shut eye.

At least that’s how it is supposed to work. At Carhaix I had a head full of ideas about how best to quit - not exactly soothing thoughts to drift off with. Pile on a neighbor who could stand on the podium in the volume contest at the snoring olympics, and it was impossible to sleep. I tried for an hour and a half, but it just wasn’t happening. After some food and rest everything looked better though, and I made up my mind to go on.

I got up, ate again, put on dry clothes and headed out for Brest. It was about 11pm when I left. Though the previous night had been dark, it was nothing compared to the second night. It was a pleasant night with a slight tailwind, and warmer than before, but it was cloudy, and I was pretty much alone. With the clouds it was pitch black. I quickly caught and passed two riders and then couldn’t see anyone. Periodically I would see headlights of other riders coming at me but there were long stretches where I just rode, hoping I was going the right way. I could tell that I was climbing steadily and had been for a long time, I was on something bigger than a hill but smaller than a mountain.

The climb turned out to be Roc Trezevel, a 1250 foot climb, and the last obstacle before Brest. I didn’t see many returning riders because the out and back sections of the course separate at this area. It keeps the roads a little less crowded during the day when there are many, many more riders, and traffic too. I only saw about 10 cars in the couple hours that it took to crest Trezevel. Eventually a group of three other riders caught me, led by (who else?) a strong Italian rider. With my new friend doing about 80% of the work for all of us we made it into Brest about 3:30 in the morning.

At Brest I ate again, had a delicious beer, and was finally able to get some sleep. After 35 hours awake and about 345 miles, I went out like the proverbial light bulb. When I was gently shaken awake at 8AM the sun was shining brightly - finally. I ate again (they had a great liver(?) pate, chock full-o-fat and salt) and took off. My legs were getting weary, but I was heading for home. Things were really looking up.

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2007 Cyclocross Season starters

2

by Dave R. on Sep 18, 2007 at 7:57 AM

ad_scx_vert.jpg Now that the rain’s arrived in the pacific northwest I think it’s safe to say Cyclocross season’s officially underway. A couple of races went down last weekend. SeattleCyclocross.com has a good run down of local upcoming events on their schedule. Personally, I’m hoping to make it out to Starcrossed next weekend.

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Rochet Restored

0

by Dave R. on Sep 17, 2007 at 5:15 PM

rochet.jpg Check out the lugs and other great detail on this French Rochet, more pictures here. The nice folks at Elliott Bay Bicycles have been working on this for almost 2 years!

“We had to locate and replace the (French diameter) top and down tubes while saving the lugs, remove and replace all the braze-ons that were on them, fabricate and miter and braze on the Mafac brake bosses, align the frame and fork, and then do the very difficult paint job, filling all the rust pits, and then priming and sanding (several times), masking, painting the three colors, striping, box lining, and did I mention in there reproducing the decals from pictures? “

There’s still a ways to go check back on the flickr set for updates.

Also see the photos Byron took during a visit with Bill last week.

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The Facts

6

by andrew_f_martin on Sep 17, 2007 at 11:51 AM

A great article today in the <a href=”href=”http://seattlepi.nwsource.com”>Seattle Post-Intelligencer on the truth behind “who pays for roads?”. If you ever need fuel for your pro-bike argument - this is a good place to start.

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Bike Hugger Jersey Update

3

by Byron on Sep 17, 2007 at 8:31 AM

We have limited quantities of the jerseys and are selling them now for $75.00. The jerseys are custom made for us by Hincapie Sporstwear with their best technical materials in their Colombian factory.

Purchase

The jersey purchase page is up and running, they’re en route to Amazon, and you can also buy them at Elliott Bay Bicycles.

hugga_mark.jpg

Sizing

Please note that Hincapie Sportswear is sized for “a slimmer athletic fit.” That means it’s a snug jersey. The sizing matches the chart , but an XL is not for the Clydesdale class.

If you want a less form-fitting size, order the next size up.

Details

Jersey features

  • Hugga style!
  • Logo badge front & logo icon back
  • 3 pockets and a comfy collar
  • short-sleeve & YKK full length zipper
  • SmartDry wicking fabric
  • Sun Smart 30 UPF
  • the wonders of lycra

Hugga Spotting

It’s easy to spot a Bike Hugger in the jersey – check all the sightings on our Photostream. We want to see YOUR photos. Just upload to Flickr and tag them with “bike hugger jersey.”

We don’t have any models on staff here at Hugga HQ, but we’ll get some studio shots from our photog friends and upload them.

Returns

If the jersey doesn’t satisfy your every desire, or just doesn’t fit, we’ll gladly take it back, with the following conditions

  • Fit tested, but not washed or ridden
  • Tags on
  • in Hincapie packaging

Now if there’s any problem with the construction of the jerseys, contact us and we’ll work it out.

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PBP - Misery

0

by Andy Tetmeyer on Sep 17, 2007 at 8:29 AM

The first night was the best thing about PBP. Although I didn’t see any French countryside, I couldn’t really see the hills coming, and at least the first night it did not rain. For me, the first night was the best part of the whole ride - flat tire and chasing aside. Like everybody else I was full of adrenaline and sheer excitement. The weather was good too. At about 55 degrees it was perfect kneewarmer/armwarmer/wool jersey weather.

The first checkpoint on the way out was just a food stop. I hit it about 2 AM and had a ham sandwich and coffee. They were selling beer and wine, which wasn’t a huge surprise. What shocked me…

was the amount of guys drinking beer at 2 AM. I was getting a little bleary, and here are a bunch of Euros knocking back a fortifying beer before jumping back onto their bikes to head off into the pitch black French countryside.

Most of the ride is rural, the only town of more than 20,000 inhabitants is Brest, at the turnaround. In rural France at night there is no light. Houses don’t have yard lights, but they do have shutters, and they use them. It is pitch black. This makes it a little easier to ride than in the suburbs here at home, where my eyes are constantly trying to adjust to varying light. You can get by with a much less powerful light, assuming that you trust there are no potholes. If there were I didn’t find them.

The second checkpoint was about 220k into it. I got there about 5, the sky was just beginning to turn grey, and there was a lot of moisture in the air. I got off and my neck was just killing me (I had borrowed a camelback because I was worried about running out of water on the first night. Not only did I not use it enough to get my neck used to it, but I didn’t take a single swig from it. It wasn’t hot enough to worry about getting thirsty). I packed away the camelback and went in to stand in line for food and to get my control card stamped. I was getting pretty sleepy and weary by this point, but knew that I would perk up with daylight.

It was getting light when I came out, and I did perk up. Then the rain started.

I know some guys who went over to race in France, and they tell me that rain showers are really common. These weren’t showers, they were all day rain with short breaks where it only drizzled. Even with a rain jacket, you get wet in an all day rain. It was cold too. I was wearing 2 pairs of shorts, arm and knee warmers, 2 jerseys (one wool) and a rain jacket. As long as I was moving I was fine, but I started to shiver as soon as I stopped. At least the ride has gotten big enough that the control points (they have pretty good food too) are all in schools. You can go in and get out of the rain to eat and warm up a little. Up until the ’90s the ride was much smaller, and controls were sometimes a big tent in a field, riders were much more on their own for food too.

With the cold and rain PBP was getting more like a forced march and less like a ride. After hours in the saddle and hours in wet shorts, my nether regions were irritated, to put it politely. There was nothing to do but keep going though. I had only recognized one other rider, a guy I rode about 15 miles with when I did my 600k brevet. Just like on that ride, he dropped me, only faster. I didn’t have a phone, not that it would have helped, since my wife was in London.

On I rode, and eventually got in a group and started to make some time. I realized that I hadn’t eaten enough through the night, and started hoovering food at the checkpoints. By 7 pm the rain had stopped, and even though it was still overcast I started to feel better. The 24 hour mark passed and I had managed 304 miles. After the checkpoint at Loudeac (2nd to last on the way out to Brest) I hooked onto a tandem with some other guys and we got a nice pull into Tinteniac.

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