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Finger Bikes, Action Figures, and More

2

by Byron on Oct 23, 2007 at 6:28 AM

finger_bikes.jpg During a recent visit to Seattle Bike Supply for a product line review – Batavus, Lapierre, Redline, and more – we got to talking about the bike industry, history, stories, and Chuck Hooper, SBS President, told Tim Rutledge and me about the strangest prototype he ever approved.

Shown here, it was a finger bike with matching John Purse action figure head. Sales surprised all and remarkably, I remembered the ads for finger bikes.

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Orbea Lobular Pista

3

by Mark V on Oct 22, 2007 at 8:13 PM

orbea%20side%202.jpgOrbea doesn’t really advertise that they do full custom aluminium frames, but they do. I’m not talking about custom spec’ed kits; I’m talking frame geometry. And not just top tube length: full custom geometry!. They also make a track version of their sexy Lobular aluminium road frame. Put the two together and you get HOT HOT HOT.

Check this bike.

I was gonna get the Easton wheels, but they are now pushed back to January. And I already had these Corima wheels.

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p> orbea%20side.jpg

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p> virtual size 48cm

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p> seat tube actual: 39cm c-t, 35cm c-c

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p> seat angle 75.5 degrees

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p> head angle 73.75degrees

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p> effective top tube: 52cm

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p> chainstay: 38.5cm

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p> bb drop: 4.8cm

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p> frame/fork/headset: 1602gr (real)

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p>

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p>

Frame is Orbea/Dedacciai aluminium, and the fork is Zeus FCM full carbon

Also: Fizik Arione k:1 carbon saddle, Easton EC90 Zero seatpost, Easton EA90 stem, Easton EC90 Track Ergo bar (carbon), Corima 4-spoke front and rear C+ carbon track disc with Conti Sprinter tubulars, DA crank, Sugino Zen ring, DA cog, Wipperman WeiSstern chain, Yoshida grips, Speedplay Zero stainless pedals.

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p> orbea%20seat%20stay.jpg

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p> Weight is about 14.5 lbs with Corima wheels, maybe less. It weighed 15.5 lbs on high-flange DA hubs on clinchers with a front brake.

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p> orbea%20downtube.jpg

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Taipei Bikes Work

6

by Jason Swihart on Oct 22, 2007 at 1:09 PM

Last Friday in Taipei, I went for a second ride with Dahon to test ride some prototypes and hang out. On the way, Josh Hon and I riffed about how we ride in the U.S. all decked out in Spandex, cleats, and helmets, whereas in lots of other places in the world, bikes are just normal part of life, no fuss required.

Apropos that conversation, in Taipei I saw people moving themselves on bikes, but I also saw a ton of people using bikes for work–such as this ancient woman grunting a load of who-knows-what to who-knows-where. These three wheelers were everywhere–some heavily modified with gas-powered motors and low gearing. But only this one was moving slowly enough for me to get a photo–whatever she was hauling must have weighed a ton.

Photo: Grunt, originally uploaded by mobil’homme.

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2 Mile Challenge in Davis

0

by Byron on Oct 22, 2007 at 8:15 AM

Sue, in charge of the Hugga Hookups, had a chat with the 2 Mile Challenge bus boss and got the down low from a recent stop in Davis, CA. There’s also lots of photos of the Davis stop and more on Flickr.

Video available on our Huggacast.

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Team Bike Hugger on the Cross Circuit

3

by andrew_f_martin on Oct 22, 2007 at 6:18 AM

Racing Cross I finally got my single speed cross bike setup. Saturday was a shakedown ride, and today was the Redline Cup at the Kelly Creek Cross Race. I’ll spare you the details of the race, but will tell you that hanging out with a bunch of ‘crossers is a great way to spend a Sunday. The atmosphere at a cross race is like a party with people bundled up for the fall weather, tipping back some beers, snacking on bbq, ringing the cowbells and yelling for all they are worth. That, and it’s a GREAT way to have a go at racing. It’s a no-pressure environment, most any bike is welcome, and you can get a 1-day license for $10. Interested? - post a comment with questions and we’ll do what we can to make sure you have what you need to get started.

looping coursesThe courses typically loop back on themselves and offer many good vantage points for spectators. Vendors join the fray to offer all sorts of goodies and raise money for a number of causes. Today’s race was to benefit a local Bonney Lake Food Bank. One of the cool aspects of the race is that people tend to “adopt” riders during the race. A couple nice folks at the top of the run-up were vocal BikeHugger fans by the end of lap 3. The kit gets noticed as I got a number of comments after the race. One guy even came up to me to ask if “are you the guy that raced with Cipo?” - YEAH!

Demonstrating my somewhat fluid dismounts:Racing Cross

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How Clif Bar Rolls

0

by Byron on Oct 21, 2007 at 1:29 PM

In Huggacast Episode Eleven, we go inside the Clif Bar biodiesel bus before it departed on the 2 Mile Challenge tour. Clif Bar’s 2MC is educating the masses to the benefits (personal and for the planet) of urban cycling. Clif Bar found that 40% of urban travel is 2 miles or less and the magic bus demonstrates how easy it is to ride to work, school, or the store – all within 2 miles.

Bike Hugger is working with Clif Bar to blog from the various cities the 2MC visits.

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Cyclists safer in numbers?

4

by Dave R. on Oct 20, 2007 at 9:45 AM

Biciclette fumettose

The New York Times Freakonomics folks had an interesting run down of studies on cycling safety a couple of days ago, under the title Will Bicycling to Work Get You Killed?. Timely considering another recent fatality here on the West Coast.

The intuitive answer is that the more riders there are, the higher the chances of a fatality. The article sites a counter-intuitive result from the Safety in Numbers study (Full text): “An individual’s risk while [cycling] in a community with twice as much [cycling] will reduce to 66%”.

Weirdly, the Freakonomics article morphs this study (and a few other links) into a discussion of cyclists obeying traffic laws and helmets. The cited study actually draws a very different conclusion: more pedestrians or cyclists cause motorists to behave differently.

It seems unlikely that people walking or bicycling obey traffic laws more or defer to motorists more in societies or time periods with greater walking and bicycling. Indeed it seems less likely, and hence unable to explain the observed results. Adaptation in motorist behavior seems more plausible and other discussions support that view.

The Pucher study noted in the Freakonomics article looks into the methods used in the Netherlands and Germany to improve cycling safety. Almost all of the methods noted improve infrastructure or law enforcement:

  • Better Facilities for Walking and Cycling
  • Traffic Calming of Residential Neighborhoods
  • Urban Design Oriented to People and Not Cars
  • Restrictions on Motor Vehicle Use
  • Traffic Education
  • Traffic Regulations and Enforcement

Maybe I missed it, but I really didn’t see much information in the cited articles about how helmets or cyclist behavior was involved in improving safety. I’m all for education and safety equipment, but I’m always amazed at how the media discussion tends towards pushing responsibility for safety away from infrastructure and motorists.

The only mention of modifying cyclist behavior in the studies is Pucher’s note about traffic education for motorists and non-motorists. In addition to encouraging motorists to be aware of non-motorists, children overseas are routinely educated in defensive behavior when dealing with traffic. Genius, I say.

The Jacobsen and Pucher studies were published about the same time, so it’s easy to see how they failed to influence each other. From my point of view, Pucher et al could have added another item to their list: More cyclists in the Netherlands and Germany made all those cyclists safer.

The other cool thing here? Getting your spouse, friend, or evil arch enemy to ride makes you both safer. All the more reason to get everybody out riding. Bring on the bike busses!

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Hugga Comfort on Amazon.com

2

by Byron on Oct 19, 2007 at 7:06 AM

Hugga comfort, our retail line, is now fully stocked and being fulfilled by Amazon. That includes:

and those items all are eligible for Free super saver shipping.

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Various Lubrication Techniques

7

by Byron on Oct 18, 2007 at 11:57 AM

chain_good.jpg For those of us that ride in the rain, the pouring rain, we’ve all got our lube techniques. Some clean and lube after every ride or wait until the chain squeaks. There are wet or dry lubes, paraffin-based, and new miracle lubes that may last about 1/2 a ride. There’s no better test case than a wet, grimy ride.

As I wrote about earlier this year, I use Lubriplate Chain and Cable Fluid. Cleaning up the rain bike for this weekend, I didn’t bother relubing from last year. It’s still gooey and smelly. I just wiped it down.

So what are your lubrication techniques? What works and doesn’t work?

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