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Meanwhile in Bermuda

2

by Jason Swihart on Sep 22, 2007 at 7:34 AM

While we were bringing the jerseys to market, putting the Hugga Hookup together, and just starting to think about getting the rain bikes ready for Fall, the women of Team Bike Hugge we’re racing the Bermuda Grand Prix.

from the Bike Hugger Photostream.

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Being Dutch with Bikes

4

by Byron on Sep 22, 2007 at 6:38 AM

The Dutch government is taking firm measures to discourage cars. Sundays are no car days, SUVs are taxed, and the more you pollute the more you pay. Read on and rejoice. And check the 3-level bike parking structure in this Amsterdam documentary

During Interbike we’ll look for the Dutchness and blog it up. New models are coming to the US from Batavus, including the Lightning.

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The Hugga Hookup

0

by Byron on Sep 21, 2007 at 5:31 AM

We’re expanding our Interbike presence and coverage this year with the Hugga Hookup, during the Criterum Championship. At the hookup we’ll have products, industry, racing coverage, blogging, and podcasting. The hookup is about creating community during Interbike, talking about what we do, hanging out, and watching the bike race.

So far, we’re hooking up with

Swobo, Reynolds, and more of our friends have said they’re coming. The best part is that you’re all invited.

How to hookup

Show up at our tent during the race. Bring your product, yourself, a great idea, your industry stories, and hang out. If you’re a blogger, come and blog with us. The details

Who
You & Bike Hugger
What
The Hugga Hook Up
Where
World Criterium Championships, Mandalay Bay Convention Center, Las Vegas
When
Thursday, September 27, 2007
6:00 PDT
How
Just show up

Team Bike Hugger

Hugga Jersey Our team is racing the Industry Cup in our new kits and either rejoicing after we finish or recovering after getting dropped!

We’re easy to spot, we look like this photo.



Props to Swagger

The hugga hookup is a concept we’ve been working on for a while and it came together with the help of Ravi and the Swagger LLC crew organizing the race.

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Mountain biking speed record broken

1

by Dave R. on Sep 20, 2007 at 4:08 PM

Markus Stöckl finished out the last day of summer riding his mountain bike down a… mountain. Unsurprising I suppose, except for the following: Top speed of 130mph or 210 km/h. On Snow. This breaks an 8 year old world record. Several of the articles mentioned he was forced to hold his breath during the descent. Personally, I’d be much more worried about my bowels. Clench inducing movie is here.

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Time flies on the Flyby

9

by Byron on Sep 20, 2007 at 9:34 AM

Following up on our Flyby podcast, Novara got us their new Dahon-engineered folding bike for a long-term test and I rode it on Alki last night.

time_flys.jpg

I think it’s the combination of the swooping frame, graphics, and little wheels that gets the attention – for me it was the Nexus 8-speed shifting and the ability to actually climb hills on it. Shot the photo with my iPhone.

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Ultra Mobile Bike Devices

10

by Byron on Sep 19, 2007 at 3:50 PM

While Intel announces all sorts of the “new” at the Intel Developer Forum, I’m thinking “does this tech apply to bikes?”

Sure we’ve got heart rate monitors, trip and speed computers, power meters, GPS, but I’m thinking an iPod bike or ultra-mobile PC that I can pop into a basket on my urban bike, like the BenQ.

There’s a Nike+iPod, why not a bike?

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Why I ride fixed

6

by Dave R. on Sep 19, 2007 at 3:37 PM

“So you can’t coast on that?” The question comes up pretty often. My bike is usually out in front of my desk and folks catch on pretty quick that there’s something odd about it. No shifters, no corncob, no derailleurs. The question comes up after the explanation, and it almost always boils down to “why?”. I know it’s been said before many times, many ways – here’s my go…

I’m trying to be less of a man. I’ll admit it, I’m more of a man than I’d like to be. Twenty pounds less would be a good start. Commuting is part of my fitness regiment (something no *ov rider can say), and I ride fixed to make sure I get the most out of my commute. Cycling is a fantastic sport which creates incredible athletes, but for those of us schlubs who aren’t in it to win it there are just too many opportunities to coast. Even when I ride freewheel bikes I get all sweaty, so let’s just go whole hog and pedal the whole way to work, eh? One of the biggest jaw-droppers for folks is not the no-coasting thing but the single-gear thing. I’ll definitely loose out to the gal who’s can shift down to climb the tall ones (and I have). To my mind, mashing the pedals to get to the top is a special kind of locomotive resistance training. My only other option is to swallow my pride, climb off, and push it and that’s pretty good incentive even for me.

Fast I’m not sure what it is, exactly, but I’m fast on my fixed bikes. I’m not top-speed fast, and I’m certainly not race fast, but I can really move along on my bike and I almost never have to set my mind to it. Part of it is that I’m used to keeping the pressure on. On a fixie if you™re not keeping up with the bike you’re slowing it down and so the habit of at least keeping pace grows. I also have a very good feel for just how hard I’m pushing, and how much more I’ve got to give when the next hill comes along. I also think it’s just a lot less fucking around. I’m never waiting for the chain to re-engage on the right sprocket or shifting down, I’m not winding the cranks back around for a good start, etc.

Silent and Stylish This is probably my favorite part – there’s almost no noise from my bike. When my chain’s cleaned up the loudest noise coming from my ride is the sound of my tires on the road. Cycling’s often described as flying like a bird, and I just can’t imagine birds creaking and crunching through the sky like some of the bikes I hear.

There’s no doubt that the clean appearance of fixed bikes is a big draw for lots of folks, me too. But fixie style goes way past the clean appearance. I’d go so far to say that it’s an anti-gear aesthetic, although the fixie hipsters are putting a lot more attention into the gear on their bikes than a lot of my fellow commuters (check out those pink deep-v rims why don’t cha!). Something about winnowing your bike down to real core elements and using them well. I’m far from a fixie hipster, but I do hope a teeny tiny bit of fixie charm rubs off on me. I could use it.

Not all my rides are fixed, mind you. I can’t see any reason to punish myself with a cargo bike that can’t go up hills or coast down them. And a quick run around the South of Seatac mountain bike course was all it took to convince me of the wisdom of bringing gears and a freewheel. But, for my money, nothing’s quite as satisfying as flying home on my fixed bike.

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Belt Drives

4

by Byron on Sep 19, 2007 at 2:19 PM

belt_drive.jpg Belt drives are like corduroy and Ska – they come in and out of fashion, like very 15 years or so, and this year belt-drives are back (maybe the Mighty Mighty Bosstones are planning a reunion or we can at least remember what it was like before No Doubt).

So here’s Bill Davidson holding a Delta CDrive for a project bike. He’s planning on building “a clean, oil-free bike that you can put together in a hotel room, or quickly break it down when the bike racks are full on a bus.”

A belt-drive single-speed will debut at Interbike, Ellsworth’s Signature Ride is belt-driven, and the Bicycle Design blog is pondering belt-driven design.

As belt-drives come and go, what do you think? For Urban Bikes, seems to make sense, unless it’s wet and they slip.

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