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Cycling Georgetown

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by Byron on Jan 21, 2008 at 5:41 AM

One of my regular routes is Georgetown’s Airport Way. I’ve ridden that for over 15 years and industrial Seattle has featured in many projects that range from the first net.art that Textura Design, Inc. published back in the day (TDI is the parent of Hugger Industries); to the term dreeping, which we use to describe living in Seattle.

Georgetown is seen in our photos, visual identity, and of course Bike Hugger …

bike_pile_georgetown.jpg

this photo of a tall bike pile was taken the day after the Dead Babies Race. Across the street is the old Rainier Cold Storage building that was torn down over the weekend.

During the Georgetown rides – officially called the “bridge that smells like death” for the bridge that crosses over train tracks and smells horribly like death – I’d occasionally stop and walk through the various artists shops in the Old Brewery buildings.

Riding that route won’t be the same.

What changes have you seen in your rides? Like, the defunkification of Fremont?

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More Wood!

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by andrew_f_martin on Jan 20, 2008 at 10:09 PM

Wooden Frame I found this bike on Fixed Gear Fever. I emailed Shawn (the “framebuilder”) and he sent me the story behind the bike. I’ve uploaded all the pics from Jacob for you to check out. I wanted to share it with our readers for a couple reasons:

  1. It’s damn cool
  2. The photos are quite artsy
  3. It’s really damn cool

After reading his own review, I don’t know how functional the thing is, but as bike art it’s about as cool as it comes. Jacob is a design student, and is actually looking for an internship - so if you are a reader that runs a big design shop and has a slot for an innovative guy like Jacob - hit the Contact page and I’ll get you in touch with him.

Here’s the story as Jacob tells it:

Well the story of the bike is that I was sitting in old Chicago’s with another hipster buddy of mine and we started talking about bamboo bikes and how neat we thought those were. The conversation turned towards how we could build a similar bike and we decided that it would take at least some complicated fixture to set the bottom bracket, head tube, dropouts, etc.

We needed to solve for exactly where it needed to be to get the geometry right then glue it together, and even after everything was glued the bike would be almost unrepairable if something cracked or broke…….because it’s still wood.

So I started to think about how to build a bike that required no glue. Me and my buddy were also taking our hot metals class for our industrial design degree, so I wanted to get some credit for my design. Because the head tube and bottom bracket are welded they would qualify for my hot metals project. I started to think of a flat pack - ready to assemble wood bike. Not necessarily mass producible, but maybe it could be if some tweaks were made. I was thinking of stacking shapes for the design and I came up with the idea that there would be different planes: a center plane and two outer planes that would be essentially be mirrors of each other. I had used Baltic birch plywood before and because it’s a tightly compressed ply-wood it is void free, very strong, and doesn’t warp or twist easily. I drew up a bunch of ideas and started to do the CAD work that actually took longer than anything else.

Because I did most of the work on the computer I was able to change the geometry and styling easily, then I ordered the bottom bracket and raw head tube material and machined those parts and welded the plates that attach the head tube to the three vertical planes. I had the wood pieces cut out on a CNC router and once everything was finished and painted I just bolted it together. The rear wheel is put in by spreading the flat side panels out and putting the axle in the slot, then tension for the chain is done with wood spacers in those slots.

But how is it to ride? It’s like riding a rubber band. It is the most unique feeling because the plywood is really vertically stiff - it doesn’t feel like its going to break, but over the long sides it has a certain amount of sway. The best way I could describe it is like the springiness of a diving board and how it only springs in one direction without twisting. The bottom bracket swings side to side while pedaling and the heat tube has twist when pumping kind of hard, but the bike just kind of wriggles under you wile riding. At slow speeds it is defiantly tricky but at cruising speed it feels like you could swing through cones just carving lines. It really is a blast, and I made it so that if it ever went all Buffy the Vampire Slayer the parts could be replaced easily because they all bolt apart so if one side ever cracked just that piece could be replaced.

Wooden Frame

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Designer Bike Racks

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by Byron on Jan 20, 2008 at 10:13 AM

From Landscape Forms, a collection of bike racks that include the Ring, Bola, Pi, and Flo.

flo2l.jpg

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The King of Pants

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by Byron on Jan 20, 2008 at 9:16 AM

While I was at CES, I missed the whole Rock Racing, King of Pants thing, but Andrew got me up to speed.

michael%2Bball%2Bwheel.bmp.jpeg Out on a ride, I heard Cipo is signing with Rock and the Pants King, but then again maybe not. During Interbike, I stood with others at Rock’s Lamborghini display and wondered, “what does this have to do with bikes?” Later, I bumped into Frankie Andreu (I did notice he was wearing some really tight pants), talked with him about it, and figured out it was this guy with money throwing it around the sport. I didn’t meet Ball, but did hear all of his primes during the Interbike crit and saw his team pull up in Escalades. Not my thing, but hey he could’ve thrown his money at stripper poles and hip-hop culture.

So, I’m all for bringing rock and roll to the sport, fill the office park crit with fans, but also realize the sport has its traditions. We’ve worked with Hed Cycling on our bike projects – Jet 60s will complete the new race bike – and companies like Hed are what drive this industry and sport. While Ball can pop off all day, it’s what he does and makes some headlines, I’m sure Hed would rather just get back to building wheels.

An interesting footnote to this story, is that Andrew raced with Cipo and Tim Mulrooney from Hed during Rock Racing’s crit – here’s the photo.

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Schooner Exact Anniversary Party

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by Byron on Jan 19, 2008 at 2:42 PM

Tonight is the Schooner Exact Anniversary Party at The Beveridge Place, 7:00 PM.

Schooner Exact is “a local, small batch microbrewery focused on quality, handcrafted ales,” and last year brewed up Bike Hugger Brown for us. Good stuff.

Other blogs have noticed and Bike Hugger will be there

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Bike Chute Aeronaut

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by Jason Swihart on Jan 19, 2008 at 7:43 AM

From the what’s old is new department, I bet when the Parasailers were first marketing their thrill rides to tourists, it was all the newest thing.

Ah, but back in the day of safety bikes, Mr. Kabrich was the Bike Chute Aeronaut. I wonder if he chatted up the ladies with talk about “the draft” and “being aero.”

From the Library of Congress bike photos uploaded to Flickr by fixedgear.

More from the Bike Hugger Photostream.

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Bikes on Buses: getting left behind

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by Dave R. on Jan 18, 2008 at 7:27 PM

Seattle’s had it’s fare share of problems with bike on buses lately, but this article makes it clear it’s not all Metro’s fault. Apparently almost 900 people a year forget their bikes in bus racks. Kent Peterson to the rescue – if you left yours on, he (or some other nice person) can help you get it back at Bikestation. Frankly, it’s not clear to me what gets left behind more often, the bike or the rider.

I can easily imagine how this might happen, especially at a busy bus stop when talking with a friend. The driver drives off and there’s not much more you can do. Of course, the article mentions other reasons as well (hempfest being the chief culprit, although I’m sure all sorts of things get left on the bus during that day).

I’m sure this would be way less of a shock than getting off the bus and your bike not being on the rack anymore. This is apparently fairly common in downtown according to the drivers I get a chance to speak with. All the more reason to stand at the front of the coach and keep your eye on your bike.

Any huggers had to to retrieve a bike from Kent?

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Bike Potter

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by Byron on Jan 18, 2008 at 7:27 AM

An AP wire photo with the caption: “Bangladeshi potter takes his wares to a local market for sale on a cold and foggy morning in Rohonpur, 230 kilometers (145 miles), north of Dhaka, Bangladesh.”

From AP Photo by Pavel Rahman and submitted by Jerome, BikeWintering west of Chicago, who spotted the photo using FlickrFan.

bike_potter.jpg

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