08 Redline 925

9

by Byron on Oct 25, 2007 at 6:54 AM

I’ve admired 925s since I first started seeing them in shops and on the road. The 925 is Redline’s popular, single-speed, urban bike with slightly slack geometry, wide bullhorn bars, and a 4130 chrome-moly steel frame. It’s a simple bike to get you around town or campus and is well thought out with flip-flop hubs, fenders, and aero levers for the ends of the bullhorn. Also notice how the tubes are free of excessive decals. This bike is more about transportation then showing off brand names.

925.jpg

The hugga test is to roll down the steep hill I live on and then back up it. I’ll know immediately how a bike brakes and then later how it climbs. As I discovered, I don’t want a bike to brake like a time trial bike with aero levers. Soft and spongy is not good braking and that’ll worsen in the rain. I’d add a second set of levers to the 925 and start changing out the brake pads for a more solid brake feel.

Curiously the bike was comfortable, but not particularly stiff or nimble. Granted that’s a subjective observation and not negative or really a complaint, I just noticed how on sharp turns, the bike didn’t feel balanced and a bit awkward. That has a lot to do with the wheels, big tires, and bullhorn bars. The length of chain stays and fork rake also affect the ride and it’s definitely relaxed (learn more about the geometry from Redline). The 925 is not a “snappy road bike” or “stiff-ass” track bike and that’s perfectly good for riding across town and especially for 500 bones.

We’re going to spend more time with the 925 and I’ll bring a wrench on the next ride to flip the hub over to see if I can get up the hill without walking.

Notes

  • MRSP is $499.00
  • Nice paint
  • My ankles and heels rubbed the crank arms. My feet float a lot when I ride.
  • Wear gloves. The bullhorns don’t have slots for cables and you’ll feel them through the bar tape.

Update

The 925 we tested is a one-of prototype and Redline told me today that the brake levers will change to address the sponginess I described above. Regarding the ride, as the name says 925, this bike is meant to be relaxed and that it is. Also, a correction that the bike is not yet shipping.

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Girls, Skirts and Bikes

4

by Byron on Oct 24, 2007 at 5:30 PM

Submitted by Zannestar, who noted that Bike Hugger loves, “girls, skirts, and girls wearing skirts on bikes,” some related links

girl_skirts.jpg And here’s an entire gallery devoted to the topic and of course on flickr (don’t get me started with milfs on bikes wearing skirts and heels).

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Batavus Lightning

5

by Byron on Oct 24, 2007 at 6:23 AM

Simple, sturdy, Dutch. The Batavus Lightning is a urban, city bike. It’s equipped with Nexus 7 and roller brakes, which means clean lines and just a few cables.

It’s modern looking and focused on form and function. With the big Schwable tires, powder-coated 7005 aluminum frame, and heft, the Lightning rides very solid, with sure steering, and comfort. The flat bar and adjustable stem are for an upright position. I was able to climb hills with the gearing and straight up, really dug this bike. There was plenty of tire clearance for fenders.

batavus_midnight.jpg

With the dropouts, sliders and 130 spacing, I think you could run a fixed or single-speed as well. It’s a very understated bike and where an old-school bike industry dude would comment that it’s just another aluminum, flat-bar city bike, with 700c, and big tires; another would note that it’s got Dutch style and Nexus! One thing I did wonder is why there’s no bottle cage mounts? Well that’s because the Dutch are minimalists.

The Batavus Lighting rides well on paths and in the city.

Notes

  • MSRP is $999.99 and it’s shipping now to your local Independent Bike Dealer.
  • Roller brakes are nice, but don’t brake like DA.
  • Batavus’ website is not easy to navigate. I was unable to find this bike there, but your local dealer should get more details from SBS.

Update

The name of the bike was corrected to Lightning.

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Bag mount for Dinotte tail light

3

by Dave R. on Oct 23, 2007 at 10:14 PM

dinotte I just picked up a Dinotte tail light. A real review of the light is coming later after I get a chance to try it out. Mounting the light has been a challenge for many the simple O-ring system included works great for front lights, not so great for tail lights. Dinotte’s released an updated frame mount recently, but I’d rather have the light on my excellent Alchemy Goods messenger bag since I frequently switch bikes but always bring my bag.

Here’s a mounting option I made for the bag, out of $4 of pvc pipe. It tucks into the external side pockets on the messenger bag. The mount let’s me adjust the aim of the light both left/right and up down.

The AG Messenger bag has two external pockets on the sides of the bag. I usually use the pockets for my saddle cover. Since the pockets are made of inner tubes (like the rest of the bag) they are pretty grippy and stretchy.

My mount consists of a 3/4inch PVC ‘T’, 3 matching elbow fittings and a slip-fit bushing. Two elbows go on to the ‘cross’ edge of the T, and are adjusted so the elbows follow the same plane as the T fitting. The 3rd elbow points outward, and provides a mounting spot for one end of the Dinotte O-ring. The elbows aren’t quite long enough to reliably fit both sides of the O-ring, so I picked up a bushing as well, which I fit in to the elbow leaving just enough of a seam to allow the other side of the O-ring to slip into.

To aim the light right or left, I can just turn the 3rd elbow in the direction I want. Aiming the light up or down is done by rotating the light engine and O-ring on the elbow/bushing joint. The aiming feature is important since the bag could fall on various parts of my back and point in various directions depending on the contents or day.

The battery pack fits perfectly inside the legs of the mount. The mount fits into the external pockets with a bit of work, which is also great. The small amount of stretch I get on fitting the mount in the pocket ensures the whole apparatus stays put. More Pics here.

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Finger Bikes, Action Figures, and More

2

by Byron on Oct 23, 2007 at 6:28 AM

finger_bikes.jpg During a recent visit to Seattle Bike Supply for a product line review – Batavus, Lapierre, Redline, and more – we got to talking about the bike industry, history, stories, and Chuck Hooper, SBS President, told Tim Rutledge and me about the strangest prototype he ever approved.

Shown here, it was a finger bike with matching John Purse action figure head. Sales surprised all and remarkably, I remembered the ads for finger bikes.

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Orbea Lobular Pista

3

by Mark V on Oct 22, 2007 at 8:13 PM

orbea%20side%202.jpgOrbea doesn’t really advertise that they do full custom aluminium frames, but they do. I’m not talking about custom spec’ed kits; I’m talking frame geometry. And not just top tube length: full custom geometry!. They also make a track version of their sexy Lobular aluminium road frame. Put the two together and you get HOT HOT HOT.

Check this bike.

I was gonna get the Easton wheels, but they are now pushed back to January. And I already had these Corima wheels.

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p> orbea%20side.jpg

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p> virtual size 48cm

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p> seat tube actual: 39cm c-t, 35cm c-c

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p> seat angle 75.5 degrees

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p> head angle 73.75degrees

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p> effective top tube: 52cm

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p> chainstay: 38.5cm

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p> bb drop: 4.8cm

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p> frame/fork/headset: 1602gr (real)

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Frame is Orbea/Dedacciai aluminium, and the fork is Zeus FCM full carbon

Also: Fizik Arione k:1 carbon saddle, Easton EC90 Zero seatpost, Easton EA90 stem, Easton EC90 Track Ergo bar (carbon), Corima 4-spoke front and rear C+ carbon track disc with Conti Sprinter tubulars, DA crank, Sugino Zen ring, DA cog, Wipperman WeiSstern chain, Yoshida grips, Speedplay Zero stainless pedals.

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p> orbea%20seat%20stay.jpg

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p> Weight is about 14.5 lbs with Corima wheels, maybe less. It weighed 15.5 lbs on high-flange DA hubs on clinchers with a front brake.

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p> orbea%20downtube.jpg

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Taipei Bikes Work

6

by Jason Swihart on Oct 22, 2007 at 1:09 PM

Last Friday in Taipei, I went for a second ride with Dahon to test ride some prototypes and hang out. On the way, Josh Hon and I riffed about how we ride in the U.S. all decked out in Spandex, cleats, and helmets, whereas in lots of other places in the world, bikes are just normal part of life, no fuss required.

Apropos that conversation, in Taipei I saw people moving themselves on bikes, but I also saw a ton of people using bikes for work–such as this ancient woman grunting a load of who-knows-what to who-knows-where. These three wheelers were everywhere–some heavily modified with gas-powered motors and low gearing. But only this one was moving slowly enough for me to get a photo–whatever she was hauling must have weighed a ton.

Photo: Grunt, originally uploaded by mobil’homme.

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2 Mile Challenge in Davis

0

by Byron on Oct 22, 2007 at 8:15 AM

Sue, in charge of the Hugga Hookups, had a chat with the 2 Mile Challenge bus boss and got the down low from a recent stop in Davis, CA. There’s also lots of photos of the Davis stop and more on Flickr.

Video available on our Huggacast.

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Team Bike Hugger on the Cross Circuit

3

by andrew_f_martin on Oct 22, 2007 at 6:18 AM

Racing Cross I finally got my single speed cross bike setup. Saturday was a shakedown ride, and today was the Redline Cup at the Kelly Creek Cross Race. I’ll spare you the details of the race, but will tell you that hanging out with a bunch of ‘crossers is a great way to spend a Sunday. The atmosphere at a cross race is like a party with people bundled up for the fall weather, tipping back some beers, snacking on bbq, ringing the cowbells and yelling for all they are worth. That, and it’s a GREAT way to have a go at racing. It’s a no-pressure environment, most any bike is welcome, and you can get a 1-day license for $10. Interested? - post a comment with questions and we’ll do what we can to make sure you have what you need to get started.

looping coursesThe courses typically loop back on themselves and offer many good vantage points for spectators. Vendors join the fray to offer all sorts of goodies and raise money for a number of causes. Today’s race was to benefit a local Bonney Lake Food Bank. One of the cool aspects of the race is that people tend to “adopt” riders during the race. A couple nice folks at the top of the run-up were vocal BikeHugger fans by the end of lap 3. The kit gets noticed as I got a number of comments after the race. One guy even came up to me to ask if “are you the guy that raced with Cipo?” - YEAH!

Demonstrating my somewhat fluid dismounts:Racing Cross

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