Buy Nothing Day

6

by Byron on Nov 07, 2007 at 6:25 AM

zenta_claus.gif This November, environmentalists, social activists and concerned citizens in as many as 65 countries will hit the streets for a 24-hour consumer fast in celebration of the 15th annual Buy Nothing Day, a global cultural phenomenon that originated in Vancouver, Canada.

You can celebrate this “you weren’t born to shop” event in Seattle, on bikes of all types, by joining the Cargo BIke Ride on the 23rd at noon.

Share this story:

Seattle Adopts BMP

2

by Kelli on Nov 06, 2007 at 5:04 PM

In a unanimous vote last night, the Seattle City Council adopted the Bike Master Plan. More over at Cascade:

Today is a milestone in the history of bicycling in Seattle. For three years, Cascade Bicycle Club has worked with the Seattle Department of Transportation, Toole Design Group, the Mayors Citizens Advisory Group, citizen organizations, and thousands of members of the community to craft an exceptional plan. With the passage of the Bicycle Master Plan, we believe we are well on our way to transforming bicycling in Seattle.

Share this story:

Please Ride Legally

21

by andrew_f_martin on Nov 05, 2007 at 2:30 PM

Having spent my lunch reading over the spew that is the Seattle Post-Intelligencer comments board, I’d ask that the hugger readers take at least a few of these car-focused comments to heart. Let’s not blow red lights. Let’s at least make an effort to stop at stop signs. Let’s be safe when/if riding on the sidewalk. There are a lot of people working very hard to improve the position of the cyclist in the roads, so please make their job easier by following the rules - even just a little bit.

Share this story:

New York Times on Portland Oregon: Friendly to bikes and business

3

by Dave R. on Nov 04, 2007 at 10:48 PM

There is interesting article in the New York Times today, all about Portland. The article covers some of the well known cycle-friendliness of the city itself, but really centers in more on the 125 cycle related business the city sustains.

Share this story:

Car/Cyclist conflicts: Road Rage in Fremont, BBs in West Seattle

17

by Dave R. on Nov 04, 2007 at 10:16 AM

Watch your backs and memorize license plates, Seattle area cyclists. Thursday November 1st Peter McKay suffered a punctured lung after being shot from a moving car. The police speculate the weapon was a .22 hand gun loaded with b-bs. Check out the comments on Peter’s blog to see the outpouring of support form the commuter and Randonneur community.

Earlier in the week police were called to the scene of a road rage incident. A SUV driver tried to hit a cyclist or run him off the road, apparently following him from the Freemont Bridge to Stone Way. Police were called when the driver pulled his car sharply into the bike lane, causing the cyclist to reach out and hit the car’s window.

Update: The PI’s chimed in with an article about tensions between cyclist and cars, specifically citing these two cases. As always, the ‘sound off’ section proves educational about just what people think about cyclists.

I’d imagine most of these incidents go unreported and un-responded to. So Huggers, have you had experiences like these recently? What would you do to reduce tensions between motorists and cyclists?

Share this story:

Pedal Power How-To

0

by Byron on Nov 04, 2007 at 6:00 AM

hpg_biker.jpg From the Campus Center for Appropriate Technology, at Humbold University, check the Pedal Power How-to, guides, articles, and examples. Like this pedal-powered washing machine.

Also see the the commercial HPG and HPT (human power generation and trainer) from Windsteam technologies for all sorts of uses.

The last time the lights went out in Seattle, I desperately needed an Espresso machine and so with an HPG, I could just crank that baby up!

Share this story:

Share this story:

Lovely Ladies calendar release party photos

2

by Dave R. on Nov 03, 2007 at 4:08 PM

Conor_Byrne I managed to make it out to the Lovely Ladies on Beautiful Bikes calendar release party (previously reported) with the camera and got a couple of shots. Lots of people having a good time, great music, lovely ladies with their calendars, the works!

Share this story:

Pedestrian (and cyclist?) risk increases during clock roll back

0

by Dave R. on Nov 03, 2007 at 10:47 AM

Be careful out there cyclists! A study done by a couple of Carnegie Mellon professors (Paul Fischbeck and David Gerard) indicates pedestrians are 3 times more likely struck and killed after the switch to Standard Time. I can’t find the actual study to review the data, only a couple of news reports. I’d be surprised if cyclists weren’t either included in the pedestrian data set or had similar risks.

Share this story:

Texas Modalities

5

by Byron on Nov 03, 2007 at 7:04 AM

Riding in San Antonio is pretty much like Austin and I don’t know if it’s the Lance halo effect or what, but the people we met were very nice to cyclists, even giving us a ton of room on the road. When the Modal was built, we also converted Pam’s Davidson to S&S, and this was our first trip with them. We wanted to spend time with the bikes, assembling, learning how to do it, but two late meetings later and a couple business crises, we were slamming them together to get out and ride. And it went pretty well.

Pam’s bike took about 1/2 hour and the Modal was about ten minutes less because of the single speed configuration. We both struggled with the chain master links. Probably some secret bike shop knowledge we haven’t been blessed with yet, but after several tries and techniques, we got chains on both bikes. As I noted in my comments on another Modal post, riding a single speed is liberating. Where we had to stop several times to adjust Pam’s derailleur and fiddle with the master link, I was set.

modal_alamo.jpg

The Modal at the Alamo.

The Modal Ride

Note: The modal is a travel bike concept that folds and toggles between single, fixed, and geared modes.

The Modal is my third Davidson and besides the modes, Mark V designed it as a straight-up road bike. It’s the stiffest Davidson I’ve ridden and that translates into “a quickness” and reassuring agility. I expect when I ride the bike in geared mode, I can make it go real fast. I don’t know specifically if the S&S couplings make the bike stiffer, but there was not a noticeable difference from a bike without couplings.

Of all the bikes I ridden, I’ve always thought a titanium frame with a carbon fork is the best combination for ride quality. I like the feel of the road under me, the springiness of ti (not flexy) and the all-day comfort. I’ve toured and trained long hours on my ti rain bike.

Mark can add more about the subtleties of the Modal, geometry and other choices he and Bill Davidson made, but whatever they did, it resulted in a performance bike for travel. It’s exactly what we wanted the Modal to do.

The Mission

We rode the Missions ride noted here, which is a combination of wide roads with bike lanes, a National Park for the 3 Missions, and a bike path. It’s not well marked, but with the help of the locals, we found our way and rode all the way to Lake Braunig and back.

Pam is shown here on the river bike path. This path follows a centuries old aqueduct system that’s still in use today.

pam_texas.jpg

Share this story:

Page 515 of 606 pages

‹ First  < 513 514 515 516 517 >  Last › | Archives

Comments: 0

To comment