Batavus Flying D

2

by Byron on Jan 01, 2008 at 12:10 PM

Starting the new year out right, with a sunny winter day, I test rode the Batavus Flying D – D could stand for Dutchman, but definitely not dainty!

batavus_flying_d.jpg

This bike is big, sturdy, heavy (not in a bad heavy way, but good), and rolls – just like you’d expect a Dutch bike to do. At one point, I just rode right over speed bumps and let the big wheels, tires, and sprung seat take the abuse.

I was riding in style, upright and certain the bike would get me to where I was going. The bike rides like a urban cruiser, with wide, 26” rims and big, durable tires. It’s a curious, setback, relaxed, and upright ride and that’s in the rake of the fork. That’s hard to describe, but ride one and you’ll get what I’m saying …

A Sachs (now SRAM) 7 speed internal hub with coaster brake drives the bike with simple shifting and braking control. A coaster brake is like the brake you had on your bikes as a kid, you kick back your heel to slow the rear.

The bike is the beefier and bigger brother of the Lightning I reviewed earlier and also really dug. These bikes are heirloom bikes. Meaning, you’ll have it for the rest of your life and hand it down for generations.

The Flying D ships with

  • Brooks B67 leather saddle and matching leather grips
  • Wheel lock
  • Auto-on/off lights
  • Fenders

and the MSRP is $1,049.99. I rode the men’s version and I was remarkably able to climb up the steep hill back to Hugga HQ. The women’s version drops the tob tube.

Check with your local Independent Bike Dealer for a test ride. On the next ride with the Flying D, I’ll commute to downtown Seattle and back.

Notes

Roller brake corrected to coaster brake.

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Frozen Tri-Flow and other 07 observations

6

by Byron on Dec 31, 2007 at 9:33 AM

Back from Maui, and unpacking the Modal, I learned that way below zero degrees Tri-flow freezes into a gelatinous mass. I guess the Modal was put in the unheated cargo hull of the plane, cause it came back cold and stiff, with a gooey-bottled-blob of dry lube.

That interesting lesson was one of many this year for Bike Hugger. Traveling all over the world with a bike certainly changes one’s perspective and also reaffirms a common thread of cycling everywhere. In all my travels, I’d meet someone that wanted to talk bikes with me and that includes broken English at a Beijing bike pit stop.

beijing_bike_mechanic.jpg

Bike Hugger started because we noticed

a surge in bike-to-work riders, a change in the air, a wisp of urban bikes, and spotted a long-tail, sport utility bike. I thought, ‘huh, something’s going on’

and didn’t exactly expect to sell retail goods, sponsor a team, features in Dwell and men.style.com; or building this large of a community with steady, healthy traffic.

Thanks for being part of that and considering the community, please tell us what mattered to you in 07 … what do you think was the best of bike culture?

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Brompton Factory Tour

0

by Byron on Dec 31, 2007 at 7:19 AM

Our 22nd Huggacast, and last one for 07, features a tour of Brompton’s Factory with Will Butler-Adams, Engineering Director. Brompton is the London-based designer and manufacturer of the Brompton folding bicycle and related accessories.

I posted earlier this month on riding a Brompton with their tech specialist, Rory Ferguson. The video features a discussion of all the parts that go into a Brompton, welding, wheel building, and assembly. The bike shown at the end, folded by my desk, is the one I brought home. It’s a new model with a rear frame clip and a snappy 2 speed drivetrain.

Notes

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Times Columnists suggests decapitating cyclists, readers react

1

by Dave R. on Dec 30, 2007 at 9:50 AM

Sounds like Matthew Paris, a grumpy old times columnist, got up on the wrong side of his bed this year. In a satirical column entitled What’s smug and deserves to be decapitated? he goes on at some length about how in addition to all the normal atrocities associated with cyclists he’s now identified littering as enough to drive him to beheading unsuspecting riders as they zoom past. Some how I think Mr. Paris might be exaggerating a bit, but it’s interesting to see anti-cyclist sentiment in the media in London as well as in Seattle.

What’s really educational though are the comments (you may have to click the ‘read all … comments’ link yourself, sorry), almost uniformly pro-cyclist. It’s a refreshing change for me to see positive public reaction in the media.

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City bikes gaining popularity with (celebrity) parents and kids

6

by Dave R. on Dec 28, 2007 at 5:42 PM

There are a lot of things to like in this photo: New Orleans, single speed city bikes, urban cycling, many (3!) kids in tow, and the fact that Brad Pitt seems to have adopted my habit of sticking ones tongue out when hauling a heavy load. Most of all I’m encouraged that cycling culture can get a bit of a plug from the celebrities of the day.

Too bad about the helmets though. Maybe the Pitt-Jolies can use a bit of their celebri-clout to engender more stylish helmets in the future. Links back to where the story came from (thanks Reno-Rambler!). I blame the Ibob folks (background reading on the Bobs) for pointing me in the right direction.

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Maui Rides

0

by Byron on Dec 27, 2007 at 9:41 AM

The wet, windy, and stormy weather shortened most of our Maui rides and made the trip to Hana and back downright brutal at times, especially when climbing. The road conditions make for tense riding because it’s slick and unpredictable. Where you’d normally slice through the s-curves, with body english and power to the pedals, the red clay-slicked road means your riding with the bike upright and very carefully – clay buildup is also a problem. Riding Maui in the rain, beats 40 degrees in Seattle, but it’s still rain.

clay_roads.jpg

The traffic is the usual in Maui – lots of it – with the addition of construction everywhere. Once you get about 5 miles out from a town, it’s no problem, but gridlock on an island, during a vacation is especially annoying. So far we’ve ridden

  • Haiku to Hana, Highway 360 – 70 miles, 3:15 (one way), tough climbing in the wind, rain, and slick conditions.
  • Napili to the Bread Stand, Highway 30 – 35 miles, 3:00, constantly up and down, torrential downpour and clay runoff during the ride back. Mr. Steepy is always hard.
  • Kihei to Napili, Highway 31 – Highway riding, mostly flat, but wind means small chain ring for most of it. During a 5 mile stretch, I was going 28 mph without pedaling, with a tailwind.
  • Around Napili and Lahaina, Highway 30 – the condo loop, about 45 minutes on the highway and trafficked roads.

For those readers into training and racing, I ride Maui for base miles at sub threshold. You can certainly go harder, but the steady, swirling winds and undulating terrain are very good to ride a heart rate tempo. It’s also surprising how hard a gentle climb is when facing the trade winds. Also, considering the wind and terrain, I ride time and not miles.

Quick Stats

  • 20 hours
  • 16,000 ft of climbing
  • 148 avg heart rate

Modal Geared

The Modal in geared mode performed as expected – very well. It’s built for performance riding and adept at climbing, cornering, and all-day riding. The Ti frame is comfortable, precise, and controlled with minimal road vibration and shock (as you’d expect from a quality Ti frame, built by Bill Davidson). I’ll adjust the sliders for more road clearance and swap cassettes to a 27 next time.

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Should Seattle license cyclists?

14

by Dave R. on Dec 26, 2007 at 11:05 AM

The PI’s got an interesting article on licensing cyclists. It’s a popular and perennial idea – it’s even come up in the Washington Legislature repeatedly in recent years. The concept generally seems to be that cyclists should pay to use roads.

Fortunately, it’s pretty easy to figure out that licensing cyclists to pay for roads isn’t a good idea. It generally isn’t taken too seriously in Olympia and elsewhere, the PI Sound Off section notwithstanding. The PI has actually hosted editorials on the facts of how cyclists fund roads in the past.

The PI article does a pretty good job of showing just what a bad idea this is, although you really have to read the whole article to get a full picture.

One (this one anyway) might wonder why licensing cyclists is such an attractive idea. There are several underlying thoughts: That cyclists are not paying for the roads like drivers are; that a licensing program would generate revenue to pay for additional facilities; that licenses would allow more enforcement; and would legitimize bikes on the roads.

An earlier article in the PI goes a long way in explaining away the first concern. Here’s a quote from the abstract of Whose Roads which is cited in the article

Although motorist user fees (fuel taxes and vehicle registration fees) fund most highway expenses, funding for local roads (the roads pedestrians and cyclists use most) originates mainly from general taxes. Since bicycling and walking impose lower roadway costs than motorized modes, people who rely primarily on nonmotorized modes tend to overpay their fair share of roadway costs and subsidize motorists.

The PI article yesterday by Ms. Galloway goes a long way to refute the second point. The idea that a licensing program would help pay for anything beyond administering the licensing program simply isn’t borne out in the real world. Even if a licensing program were to pay for itself entirely it would significantly increase the cost of cycling financially and logistically. What would the benefit of this additional cost to cyclists be?

The implied answer is that licensing allows additional enforcement – if you can license something you can revoke the granted licenses. That is, if you have an enforcement arm. If licensing programs don’t generate enough revenue for funding infrastructure why would they make enough for additional enforcement? More importantly, why is a licensing program needed for enforcement in the first place? There are plenty of enforceable laws to go around if we had sufficient interest in enforcing them.

Wiping these reasons out of the way leaves us with the single best reason for having a licensing program: to legitimize cyclists as users of the road. It’s pretty sad that this is the best reason because it’s almost no reason at all – cyclists have paid for road usage (see above), and have a legal right to the roads, why should we need any additional stamp or endorsement to use them?

Regardless of the reality of the situation there’s little doubt that a few people think of cyclists as illegitimate road users. I think the best outcome of a licensing program would be curing these folks of these thoughts, although even this goal is wildly optimistic. It’d be much cheaper, easier, and more effective to just ignore these folks and keep riding bikes.

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Wrapping Paper

6

by Byron on Dec 24, 2007 at 8:55 AM

Carrying wrapping paper to the condo to wrap some presents from Santa …

wrapping_paper.jpg

Enjoy the Holidays all – the bike hugging will continue in 08 – thanks for reading and being part of bike culture with us.

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Last minute stocking stuffers for cyclists

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by Dave R. on Dec 23, 2007 at 4:33 PM

Here are a couple safety related gift ideas for the cyclist you want to see back home again after that next winter ride:

  • Glo Gloves The traffic directing gloves police officers use. These make it impossible to miss hand signals. Better yet, they’re simple Lycra shells, so they fit over any glove you have. They can be a bit hard to find, but you can buy them at Blumenthal Uniforms and Equipment on line, or at their retail outlet here in Seattle (9 am to 1 pm on the 24th!). About $25
  • Princeton Tec EOS headight It’s been said before many times, many ways but this is a great headlight. Benefits: Bright, Cheap ($40), light weight (4 oz. - with batteries), AAA batteries, 60 hrs run time for flashing, adjustable angle. Best feature – zip tie-able it to your helmet visor. This avoids the strap-a-rock-to-your-head problem with helmet mounts. Available at Second Ascent and other outdoors stores in Seattle and elsewhere.
  • Knog Frog – This is about as simple a light as you can get, and a fantastic backup light for visibility. Nice and bright on fresh batteries. I see these at every bike store I visit, usually $10 for a single light.

Happy Holidays Huggers, and safe cycling to you!

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