Speedplay Zero Pave Shipping

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by Mark V on Aug 14, 2014 at 12:29 AM

Speedplay Zero Pave pedal starts shipping, but is the SYZR offroad pedal just a hoax?

Speedplay announces that their Zero Pave pedal has begun shipping. Hooray! For 500 bucks (for ti spindle version) you too can own the road pedal for riding in conditions in which you might have to foot down into mud or dirt, but you don’t plan to walk or run off the bike. After all, with the Pave Zero, you’re still wearing a 3-bolt metal cleat with no traction on shoe with no tread. Simply put, this is a pedal system that makes it easier to get back on the bike and in the pedals, not to be easier to get around off the bike, Because that’s why this pedal exists…because Speedplay-sponsored pro teams demanded a system that debris and dirt couldn’t hinder ingress/egress. The professional riders, loathe to change something as personal as their shoe/pedal system, would clearly balk at using mtb shoes and pedals for just a couple races in the spring, like Paris-Roubaix and Strada Bianca. But for the majority of us non-Pro Tour riders and racers, we’d probably just use a 2-bolt cleat/pedal and a walkable shoe for a gravel grinder.

What I would be sooooooo much happier to see is a mtb pedal that feels and supports like a good road pedal….something like what the Speedplay SYZR promises to do. The problem is that Speedplay has been promising this pedal since at least 2008. At Interbike that year, I snapped this photo of a prototype pedal. I was told that the pedals would ship after the first of the year. Then I was told the same thing the next two Interbikes. Frankly I’ve lost track of how many times those pedals “would be shipping in three months.” Most recently, Speedplay displayed yet another update to the design at this year’s Sea Otter Classic.

Listen, I’m all for thoroughly developing a product before selling it to consumers, but this is just ridiculous. Still, I do hope the SYZR finally makes it to market, because if it performs anywhere close to the hype, it should be awesome.

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Issue 15: A Mt. Bachelor Playlist Photomap

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by Byron on Aug 13, 2014 at 1:12 PM


My editor’s letter for Issue 15 is written as a vignette and shares the music listened to during a 5 hour ride on the Cascade Lakes Scenic Byway. This annotated photomap is an accompaniment to the ride playlist.

Like a headwind in all directions, the uneven, rough-and chunky chip seal surface drained the watts, robbing my legs of speed — setting me off tempo. Grabbing for another gear that wasn’t there on the final hundred feet up to Mt. Bachelor, a dirge shuffled in. Interrupting my concentration, it was a snatch of a song, a click of a shifter. Just a few Morphine downbeat notes from a standup bass and skip!

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RockyMounts Driveshaft Thru Axle adapter for fork-mount bike racks

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by Mark V on Aug 13, 2014 at 9:40 AM

This year I acquired a new mountainbike, and other than some experiments with a dropbar mtb a few years ago, it’s the first mtb I’ve gotten since the ’90s. Things have changed since then: 29er and now 650B/27.5 wheels, tubeless tyres, carbon fibre EVERYWHERE. But the night before leaving to do my first mtb race in 16 years, the most important change was the evolution of suspension forks. Not because forks are better in some way. No, the crucial difference is that most high-end suspension forks now have some form of thru-axle that wasn’t going to fit the bike rack on my ride’s car. It was 8pm on a Wednesday evening, and we were leaving at 9am in the morning. Not a whole lot of time to find a solution, but luckily REI had one.

The DriveShaft rack adapter from RockyMounts allows your mtb equipped with 20 or 15mm front thru-axle to fit a typical fork-mount rack. It even allows you to lock the bike in place (assuming that the rack itself has a lock too). Hint: the DriveShaft tends to rotate in the fork, so make sure you clamp the adapter into the rack and then the fork on the adapter. All fork-mount racks make me a little worried, but once you clamp the bejeezus out of the rack-to-DriveShaft connection, the DriveShaft’s grasp on the thru-axle seems really secure.

Retails for about $70.

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Issue 15 The Mountains and Burnt Socks

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by Byron on Aug 12, 2014 at 11:28 AM

He’s one of the smartest people I know and Chris Matthews still put his cycling socks in the oven. You can guess what happened next, right? The story of how he rode without socks until the next town with a store, and a sock aisle is featured in Issue 15 of Bike Hugger magazine.

And I can relate. When riding, I often become stupider. I have a permanently-scarred knuckle from this one time when I decided to dry my cycling shorts in the microwave. I did not know that the shorts (a pair of piece-of-shit Pearls perhaps or equally shitty Assos during one of their bad importer periods), had a plastic insert sewn into the pad. I guess the insert held the pad in place and microwaves melted it into a molten, burn-skin-to-the bone mass that scarred me instantly.

Chris didn’t get burnt, but had to endure a sockless ride and luckily no other Rapha Gentlemen saw him sans socks, suffering on a climb. I would have called that out if seen, like I did Lance Armstrong, when he was spotted sockless.

The burnt sock story is featured and you can read it for free with a sign in.

Besides the free cover story, Issue 15 includes 10 more articles like

And a mountain playlist from me.

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Robin Williams: Appreciated

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by Byron on Aug 12, 2014 at 9:23 AM

Robin

RIP

The last time everyone I knew was unmoored by a death it was Adam “MCA” Yauch.

Now Robin Williams.

Bike Hugger Magazine contributor Patrick Brady writes about him as an enthusiastic cyclist.

As a cyclist, his jokes about our proclivities, about the Tour de France, about the bike itself gave us permission to see ourselves through other eyes, to laugh at ourselves. What a gift.

And it seems wherever Robin traveled he stopped at a shop, including the one in Seattle where Mark V works.

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EXO on Bikes

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by Byron on Aug 11, 2014 at 9:30 AM


Back from vacation and finishing up Issue 15 that drops tomorrow, here’s a moment of zen – a video interlude with K-Pop boy band EXO riding bikes around on stage.

The fans go nuts.

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In the Mountains: Chipseal

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by Byron on Aug 09, 2014 at 7:30 AM

Hhg

Rode three flavors, grades actually, of Chipseal near La Pine Oregon, and Mt. Bachelor. The aggregate and tar was blended as crunchy, crunchier, and crunchiest. Even with a Ti bike, 290 TPI tires, and a carbon fork, the crunchiest sections made my hands and feet go numb.

Considering roads were originally made for cyclists, Chipseal is such a mixed blessing.

Roads are not merely paved or unpaved, smooth or rough, they are complex characters revealing their true natures when the rubber meets the road – Kent’s bike blog.

In the mountains, on Forest Service roads, you can ride for hundred of miles, and many of them will rattle your bones. The uneven, rough surface drains the momentum out of your legs.

Issue 15 drops next month and the theme is the mountains. We’ll have more stories about our rides, including this one on road, and dirt.

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Sunriver

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by Byron on Aug 08, 2014 at 6:58 AM

Hjj

A 3 hour ride turned into 4 when I got lost in the labyrinth of paths at Sunriver resort. On vacation, riding to and from Mt. Bachelor with stories to follow and another issue of our magazine next month.

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RockShox: Prove Can’t Wrong

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by Byron on Aug 06, 2014 at 7:18 AM


With the mountain-biking season now in full swing and Crankworx Whistler upon us, RockShox wanted to do something to celebrate those who progress the sport forward. Every year, we see things people once thought “can’t be done” get done. This short film called “Prove Can’t Wrong” is a salute all those who push boundaries to prove that “can’t” is a matter of opinion. We can’t wait to see what “can’ts” get proven wrong this year.

My can’t was a roadie returning to mountain biking…

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Oregon Manifest Winner: Denny

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by Byron on Aug 05, 2014 at 11:36 AM

Denny

Blogging in the space where the bike and tech meet, I know how bikes like the Denny capture people’s imagination and attract the urban techster. It’s great to see locals getting press and in a King5 Interview, Teague’s designer is interviewed and the manager of Gregg’s Greenlake talks about retail price points. Teague’s offices are around the block from Davidson’s shop in downtown Seattle where many of Bike Hugger’s bikes are made.

My friend Jeremiah mentioned the Denny on Twitter and lit up the phone lines.

After Patrick questioned the authenticity of the Oregon Manifest and explained the utility bike market, the questions he’s asking now is what version of the concept is Fuji going to bring to market? Also, what will it cost?

… most bicycles sold today are meant for pleasure riding, not service. Chances are, if the bicycle is to augment our transportation needs in the future it will need to offer levels of convenience and utility that recall a car, though we may have to forego the windshield wiper and iPod jack. They will need to accommodate loads beyond ourselves. We will not stop needing groceries and if the human race is to survive, we will need to keep making babies. So at minimum, any bike we expect to augment or replace a car will need to some capacity to carry groceries and kids. I can hear it now — “Don’t make me pull this bike over.”

Clearly, we need fresh ideas about what a bike is, what a bike can be.

Guess we’ll check back in a year or so… Until the Denny arrives, for urban mobility see bikes like the Cylo that are in pre-production, Vanmoof, Tern, or any number of Kickstarters like the Helios and Vanhawks Valour.

Patrick’s and my industry wonk opinions questioned the Manifest, but that doesn’t mean we don’t share the enthusiasm. We just have some insight into how the industry works and expect a much hyped bike to do it right.

Finally Seattle is best known for Starbucks, Boeing, and Microsoft, there’s also a vibrant design scene here and in the area, distributors like SBS (Redline, Raleigh), and REI’s Novara. Bikes that’ll ship to the masses are being designed for 2017 right now, just a hour commute away from Hugga HQ.

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