Epic Beef Bar Prank

Epic Beef Bar


Someone at Hugga HQ must’ve overheard me talking about Issue 11 of our Magazine and the April Fools theme, ‘cause in the bar drawer was this beef-flavored one. I guess the plan was during a sun break, I’d just grab a bar and go, in a hurry before it squalled again. Then the prankster imagined the horrible reaction of me tearing open a Beef Habanero Cherry Bar and taking a bite. That’s like chocolate-flavored anything on an hot day or that one time Clif released premixed drinks that tasted like a locker room smells.

Friction Drilling

This is how they make the holes in Mavic Ksyrium SL rims and other similar rims where the nipples thread directly into the rim. It’s called friction drilling. Rather than having a metal bit that bites into the work piece and removes material in its path, friction drilling uses a fast-spinning conical bit that is pressed hard to the piece. The friction heats the material which flows out of the way of the bit. The friction drill bit must be made of a heat resistant material like cemented carbide (I mean, all good drill bits are made of heat resistant material, but this is way beyond cobalt steel). The advantage is that the process creates a hole with material left around the circumference; then that material can be tapped with threads for the spoke nipple.

Obliteride 2014: Riding with Jim


The Obliteride is back for 2014, with new, improved routes and we’re planning on riding along again. Last year it was a good time and I observed

Obliteride is a local story: from the routes, people, and monies raised for the Hutch. The orange is also not yellow. The focus on the experience was appreciated by all the riders we talked to and rode with; especially, the Franti concert I captured with Glass.

The Franti concert was a highlight for sure and all the dedicated cyclists I met. This August 8-10 I want to ride with Dr. Jim Olson, who’s a Fred Hutch researcher and developing ways to treat cancers with nature – scorpions, sunflowers and violets. Hope to see Jim on the 150 mile route. I heard he’s an avid cyclist. See his Tedx talk.

SRAM Guide Brakes for the Trail


Confused by what a “trail brake” is compared to another brake, I asked SRAM’s Duncan Riffle and he said

When we use the term “trail” brake or any other specified discipline it has to do with intended use for that product. IE. A Trail brake would be suitable for a wide range of short to mid travel bikes that require a light-weight, robust and powerful package to get the job done in many scenarios. Where as a “Downhill” specific brake would be less concerned about weight and more about power, modulation and durability in extreme conditions…

Ok! Still unclear if you ride trails on bikes in spandex or baggies or spandex INSIDE baggies? Will figure that out later this year when we get on the dirt. As I understand and it was explained to me by Sean Estes, technically trail braking is a technique where you use your rear brake to set the attitude of the bike going into a corner. However trail brakes are brakes designed specifically for Trail riding as opposed to say XC or DH-specific brakes. The “Trail” experience sits between XC and All-Mtn, meaning roughly 110-140 mm travel, relative light weight, all-around geometry and equally good at going up or down.

Yep and I rode a sweet bike for the trail last year up to Searle Pass on the Colorado Trail. It was a Camber S-Works with a 1 X.

Camber

A Camber for the trail

Searle Pass

Up to Searle Pass

sweet singletrack

On Singletrack

Chris Cross

Another bike edit and this one is with Chris Akrigg on a Mongoose riding over pretty much everything a MTB would. What CX racers run over, he rode.

A lot to be learned technically from riding a cross bike, have to be on point 110% of the time, I had a lot of fun putting this together.

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