Le Tour Recap: Another Day and Stage

Maybe it is a new day at the Tour. It’s another stage, of course, and Cavs didn’t start after owning the crash yesterday

“I’m gutted about the crash today. It was my fault. I’ll personally apologize to Simon Gerrans as soon as I get the chance. In reality, I tried to find a gap that wasn’t really there. I wanted to win today, I felt really strong and was in a great position to contest the sprint thanks to the unbelievable efforts of my team. Sorry to all the fans that came out to support – it was truly incredible.”

In the past, a defiant Cavs would’ve said something inflammatory AND gotten taped up, then started.

Stage 2 of the Tour de France saw record crowds for the second day and

Froome looked up to see Nibali win Stage Two.

wins

Le Tour on Twitter Recap

Reactions

Watch The Tour Without Phil and Paul

TunnelbearSure, the NBC Sports coverage might be the defacto way to watch the Tour de France, but their dumbed-down race coverage can start to get grating after a while and Bob Roll starts to talk most real cyclists glaze over. Here’s a great way to get improved coverage for just a few bucks a month (and also get access to a world of sporting events not available in the U.S.) by signing up for Eurosport streaming coverage.

If you don’t live in Europe you’ll need to first convince the Internet that you do, and for that we recommend the super-simple service Tunnelbear. Download their Tunnebear app and sign up for a subscription and you can re-route your traffic to a Eurosport-friendly country simply by signing into Tunnelbear.

Once your traffic is routed overseas, simply go to Eurosport.com and sign up for their streaming plan. All you need is a credit card, and they don’t care where the card billing location is.

That’s it, then you can simply stream Tour coverage (or the World Cup or the whole continental series of races) on your computer. Bye bye Phil and Paul, hello valuable and interesting race commentary.

Before the Tour Starts


After a week of sharing new products from PressCamp, super bikes, and before the Tour starts, a little Bike Path Fun. Met a couple taking selfies and a couple cruisers. Didn’t ask, but they may not even know who’s racing the Tour this year or care.

Taiwan’s Microshift

Microshift homepage

Shimano, SRAM, Campagnolo, and…..Microshift? Will there be day when you can’t say the first three names without including the fourth?

Microshift is a Taiwanese-based component manufacturer that has been around only since 1999, with production in both Taiwan and mainland China. In Taiwan, Microshift derailleurs and shifters are stocked in local bike shops as commonly as Shimano, but abroad they are mainly known as OEM spec on less expensive bicycles. Nonetheless, Microshift has developed a comprehensive line of products including Shimano-compatible 10sp integrated shifters and derailleurs and a host of mtb and city bike shifters. They are also hard at work bringing their own 11sp road levers to market for 2015 (no confirmation as to Shimano-compatibility) as well as an electronic drivetrain. Microshift components are also being produced for brands such as Gevenalle (nee Retroshift).

To become a real player in the bicycle drivetrain market, access to cheap manufacturing alone cannot guarantee success. A company must innovate, not just to attract consumers, but to also break free of the shackles created by existing product patents. It is no mean feat to design an integrated brake/shift lever for drop handlebars that doesn’t fall foul of patents owned by Shimano, SRAM, or Campagnolo, though perhaps a dawning era of electronic shifting may bring greater design freedom.

In my brief experiences riding Microshift products, I would never mistake their finish or function for higher tier product from like Shimano Ultegra, but they did seem like solid competition against Shimano Sora. Microshift will be seen on some entry-level 2015 road bikes from Specialized, but as Microshift grabs more share of OEM, might they one day take a bite of the high-end of the market? Over the next five years, it will be interesting how far Microshift will go.

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