We're so into Cyclocross that we made this special page for it. Also publish a Tumblr about Suffer Faces.

ENVE: Building A Faster Wheel


While my CX season was lost to a recurring injury and not being 100% healthy, we did get a set of ENVEs in on test. I didn’t race on them, but for the few spins I did, they sure felt fast. In this feature, ENVE explains how they build a faster wheel.

“FAST” lives at the intersection of stiffness, lightness and durability.

Also see Go-To-Gear: ENVE Wheels in Issue 18 and from last year and the small world department, ENVE uses a product my company makes in their production process. Both are made in the USA.

It’s a propriety process, but Clip-n-Seals keep their resins and carbon fibers fresh.

Who is the Strongest?

Observed by Richard McClung

The French National Championships…what happens when the 2nd strongest guy in the race treats the strongest guy like the golden goose…or maybe plays it to make him lose.”

CX Nats: Resumption of Racing

Racing resumes today after being cancelled yesterday and I recapped how CXNats Disappoints in the Medium Bicycles collection. Also don’t miss the saddest Freebird ever played in Texas….

CXNats Disappoints

In issue 20, before all the drama in Austin, Shawn O’Keefe wrote about the single speed race for us.

Mudageddon in Austin: CX Natz Canceled


Muddy course and in those trees, roots getting exposed, Photo: DBC

In case you missed it, it was Mudageddon in Austin after heavy rains and the last day of CX Natz was canceled to prevent more park damage to heritage trees.

As James Huang said on his Facebook.

If I understand correctly, it’s effectively considered an honor to have a ‘cross course permanently burned into your land in Belgium.

In the US, following this fiasco, an environmental impact statement is gonna be required.

I’m hearing lots of reaction and blame. While a developing story, what I understand at this time is that running thousands of racers on back to back days was/is the issue. 2-3 courses are required for events like this, in precious city parks, and unusual, biblical rain. Providence spent $50k on AstroTurf to protect the trees before the cancellation. The rain also shut down a weekend of events, besides racing.

I’m not there, but contributors Matt Hill, Shawn O’Keefe, and Dennis Crane are reporting for us. On Friday, issue 20 dropped and included a report and gallery from the single speed races.

The general cluelessness of USA Cycling in Austin reminds me of this one time when the TT course at road Natz was on the shoulder of an Interstate. Just like CrossVegas and also shared in issue 20, “Was Steve Johnson there?”

X01 10sp downhill derailleur for cyclocross

Cyclocross drivetrains with single chainrings (either 1x10 or 1x11) are certainly trending, and earlier this year SRAM delivered their CX-1 line as a single ring gruppo-in-box. The crucial elements of the CX-1 group are the narrow-wide chainring tooth design (which a multitude of boutique brands have copied in the last 9 months) and the non-slanting parallelogram rear derailleur, which optimizes shifting performance and manages chain tension. That CX-1 derailleur is heavily influenced by SRAM’s mtb designs. Or to be more accurate, the CX-1 derailleur is exactly identical to the 10sp version of the X01 DH (downhill) derailleur except for the cable routing. The CX-1 derailleur has a bolt-on interface for a barrel adjuster like other traditional road derailleurs, while the X01 DH/10sp has front entry for the cable and a bolted-on pulley assembly. I use the X01 DH derailleur because the more direct cable run leaves a less housing to catch mud, grass, or some else’s QR skewer. To tune the shiftering in the absence of a derailleur-mounted barrel adjuster, I’ve installed a Jagwire inline barrel adjuster on the housing between the handlebar and frame. Many frame designs have some sort of barrel adjuster where the housing joins near the head tube anyways. Normally SRAM road derailleurs work best with a fairly generous loop of housing, so using the X01 DH unit really cleans up that area on my Redline Conquest carbon. If you’re piecing together a cyclocross bike with a SRAM 1x drivetrain, this might be a good idea.

Before you drop the money on an X01 DH derailleur, there are a few things you should know first. Obviously, you can only use SRAM DoubleTap shifters (technically you could use the SRAM bar end shifters too, Mr Retro). It does not matter if you’re using 10 or 11sp DoubleTap levers, but you must choose the 10sp DH version of the X01 derailleur, not the 7sp DH version nor the 11sp standard version. This is because SRAM’s mtb drivetrains use different cable-pull ratios for 10 and 11sp, while SRAM’s road rear derailleurs, both 10 and 11sp, use the same ratio as the mtb 10sp. The 7sp DH derailleur is merely a short cage version of the 11sp standard X01 meant to work on a reduced range cassette with the same cog-to-cog spacing as the enormous 10-42tooth 11sp mtn cassette. The final issue is that not all cyclocross frames have a cable path for the rear derailleur that can line-up with mtb-style derailleurs. On my Redline, the path is almost perfect coming sideways out of the chainstay, but on Byron’s Specialized Crux the housing exits from behind the dropout, as is common for many bikes that are Di2 compatible.

SRAM X01 DH/10sp derailleur on Redline Conquest CX

Page 5 of 64 pages ‹ First  < 3 4 5 6 7 >  Last › | Archives

Advertise here

About Bike Hugger