More on Mr. Steepy in Maui

As it was told to us, the 20% gut-wrenching climb on Maui’s best ride was named Mr Steepy after Lance said “man that’s steep!” during a ride with some locals. Mr. Steepy is the right name and the photo doesn’t do it justice. It’s a climb where you lose all momentum immediately and it hurts as bad sitting or standing. Nearing the top, the thoughts in my head were not, “man I can climb and I’m going to kick ass next season.” Instead it was more, “when will this end, I can’t climb for shit, a few more pedal strokes, and I’m at 187 bpm!

In about 30 seconds of climbing, I was at max power and heart rate and it took me nearly a half an hour on the other side of Mr. Steepy to recover. The ride itself, before and after the climb, is hard and very challenging for me because there’s no rhythm to the road. Each crest, valley, and rise is a different grade, length, and road surface.

Not until the last hour and a half, with the big tailwind, and rolling it at 30 mph did I feel good – really good.

steepy

Narrow, Winding Roads in Maui

narrow, winding

While this “mountain in the middle of an ocean” is as car culture as it gets, after pedaling a few minutes from our resort, we found ourselves climbing, descending, and cornering the narrow, winding roads of Maui.

Last year when were in Kihei, rode Haleakala, the winery, and along the beaches. This year in the Lahaina, Napili area, we rode what I called the “road of the Gods” and the locals call the Jim Stuart Memorial (pdf).

Ktrak: Non-Dopey Snow Bike?

Hang around either the ski or the bicycle industries, and eventually you’ll encounter some form of snowbike–a misbegotten contraption that neither skis nors bikes, looks dopey, and strands its rider at the bottom of the hill.

ktrak.jpgEnter Ktrak: a snow bike that looks like fun and uses the rider’s “legs” to drive a track and thereby create locomotion. The question are: can it go uphill and can it handle deep powder?

Cross-posted to Snow Hugger

Via Engadget

What’s a Sharrow?

They are in the Seattle Bicycle Master Plan. Portland and San Francisco have them already.

Stocking Stuffers

I’m practical. I know my wife and family wouldn’t dare buy me more than a $20 cycling item. They know that no matter who they ask, it’ll probably end up being the wrong size/fit/style/color. That said there’s always room for stocking stuffers so here’s a list of the last minute little things I (and I assume most cyclists) can’t get enough of:

  1. Glove Liners - I’m not sure of the physics, but glove liners keep my hands feeling dryer in my wet gloves. I also tend to loose these a lot, thus the need for many.

  2. Smartwool Socks - I’m sure other brands are just as good, but I love my Smartwools. They are perfect for combating wet feet and they can pinch-hit as work socks if I forget.

  3. Red Blinkies - I always loose/break these things. I strap them to all of my bags and like to keep extras on hand when I run out of battery.

  4. Chamois Creme - I’m partial to Greyhound Juice, but there are plenty of players out there. It’s a consumable and I prefer to have a stash in my closet, my garage, my gym locker, and in my messenger bag.

  5. Cycling DVD’s - When I need to, I ride the trainer, and the only thing better than watching “Lost” on the trainer, is a bike movie. 90 minutes never went by so quick.

  6. Base Layers - Now that I’ve gotten used to these, I use one for every ride. The more base layers, the less often I need to do laundry.

  7. Knogs - Like rear blinkies, these are great to have on hand in case I get caught out a little later than planned.

  8. Casual Wear - who doesn’t need a cool heather-green T-Shirt?

I’d love to hear other ideas, mostly so I can try out more stuff!

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